Aircraft alloy

Hi folks,
A quick question for the guys in aerospace and materials science. A long ti
me ago, I remember hearing about an aircraft alloy (I think it was aluminiu
m based) which followed a hardness curve over about 40 years during normal
use (i.e., at normal aircraft operating temperatures). This meant that it w
as strongest after about 20 years, and then became weaker with age. Can any
one tell me the name of this alloy?
Thanks!
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
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Duralumin - Al-Cu alloy - hardens over days at room-temperature after being quenched from solution-treated (essentially annealed state) - but as far as I know that then stays permanent. There isn't really any driving-force even in geological time (for mountains to flow into the sea (!)) for the structure to coarsen and loose yield strength. As far as I know ??? Rich S
Reply to
Richard Smith
Airplanes can experience fatigue overtime, but its from vibration and flex. You really shouldn't barrel roll a jumbo jet. LOL.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
The Duralumins (Al-Cu alloys) have low very predictable fatigue crack growth rates - reason they are still used for the bidirectionally stressed underwing panels of aircraft wings (?).
Reply to
Richard Smith
Am Sonntag, 23. Februar 2020 20:37:44 UTC+1 schrieb Richard Smith:
Thanks for the thoughts. I'm at a loss to remember what the alloy was. It's possible (now I think about it) that it was for an engine part with a normal operating temperature which was a long way above room temperature.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
There's transparent aluminum. The alloy is strong enough to be used for water tanks for whales but extremely light weight. I'm not sure of the long term fatigue rate. It's pretty hard to get as each time I've tried it's on back order with no delivery date. It's probably because the alloy contains a fair amount of Unobtainium.
Steve
Reply to
shiggins
ong time ago, I remember hearing about an aircraft alloy (I think it was al uminium based) which followed a hardness curve over about 40 years during n ormal use (i.e., at normal aircraft operating temperatures). This meant tha t it was strongest after about 20 years, and then became weaker with age. C an anyone tell me the name of this alloy?
It is only available to Starfleet Rear Admiral, or higher.
Reply to
Michael Terrell
I absolutely agree that you shouldn't. But, technically speaking, there is nothing wrong with that. The barrel roll is a 1 G maneuver, so in principle, every airplane can do it.
Tex Johnston became famous for barrel rolling the 707, which at the time was a very large aircraft.
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Reply to
Robert Roland
Oh, NOW you tell me...
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Scotty and the mouse. CLASSIC ST.
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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