Anchoring Metal Bender

I bought one of those cheapy HF metal benders for the light duty bending I anticipate. I want to mount it to the concrete shop floor
but in a removeable fashion; flush bolt anchors. The only flush type I'm familiar with are the lead anchors. I want something more substantial that those. I know they will hold the bender but eventually they will become loose in the hole.
Anyone know of other types of anchors?
--Andy Asberry-- ------Texas-----
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Andy Asberry wrote:

Yep, try these... VERY Strong

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Is the bottom end closed? The 5" length would go all the way through my 4" slab.
Thanks for everyone's reply.
--Andy Asberry-- ------Texas-----
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wrote:

going through the slab would be ok. And it makes it easier to clean after they fill up with spooge, stuck there in the floor like 4 little sewer drains.
Gunner
"Deep in her heart, every moslem woman yearns to show us her tits" John Griffin
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I did this a completely different way. I mounted my HF mender on a half sheet of 3/4" plywood, and I drive my car onto it when I want to use it. No drilling, no holes in my garage floor, completely portable, and it works fine...
I got this hint from this group about 4 or 5 years ago...
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i put a socket in the floor, square steel tube, bender slides in and out, covered with a plate to keep debris from falling in when not in use.
b.w.
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 02:20:31 GMT, "William Wixon"

Excellent!
Gunner
"Deep in her heart, every moslem woman yearns to show us her tits" John Griffin
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I have had lead anchors in my floor for mounting my tubing roller for 6 years and they have never come loose.
Your best option would be to epoxy in some coupler nuts.
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I have my Hossfeld #2 bender mounted with lead anchors, with no problems. I unbolt it when not in use and run headless set screws into the holes to keep them from filling with debris. I took on of the H-F benders off the stand and bolted a piece of angle iron under it. The flange that sticks down gets clamped into a bench mounted vise. (I used 2 X 2 X 1/4" angle iron and welded a piece of 1/4" wide plate to one flange of it to make a wide enough "platform" to catch all the mounting bolts).
Pete Stanaitis --------------------------
Andy Asberry wrote:

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I would tend towards shield anchors. This sort of thing:- http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId 0058
Either that or I would epoxy threaded sockets into drilled holes.
Mark Rand RTFM
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A alternative is a drop-in anchor (secured with epoxy):
Zinc-plated steel: <http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT?PMAKA690254>
Type 303 stainless: <http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT?PMAKA690320>
You may need to cobble up some kind of fixture to ensure that the screwthread is kept perpendicular to the floor surface while the epoxy hardens, like a waxed bit of allthread in the anchor and a piece of wood.
Joe Gwinn
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Best way is to have it bolted to the metal bender. That takes care of spacing as well.
Mark Rand RTFM
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That works. I would add a piece of waxed paper to ensure that the epoxy doesn't stick bender to floor.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Andy: Before you drill into a modern concrete floor, you have to know if there are any "Surprises" down there - surprises that can kill you. I doubt you will get into this, but everyone that does Home Shop Work and gets anywhere near a carbide drill NEEDS to know about this.
On Condo first-floor slabs (over the garage), some commercial buildings built in the last 40-odd years, and even some single story slab-on-grade houses in the last 20, they can use Post-Tensioned Concrete for the floor slabs.
They put steel cables in plastic sleeves across the slab in both directions (curved slightly to go around penetrations like pipes and conduits), pour the slab, then after it sets they crank 10KPSI or more of tension on those steel cables.
WARNING: It works great at making an ultra-strong slab that won't develop age cracks - but. IF YOU EVEN NICK ONE OF THESE CABLES WITH A DRILL BIT WHILE UNDER TENSION, IT CAN SNAP, AND YOU CAN BE HURT OR KILLED. The concrete around the snapping-back cable spalls and explodes like a fragmentation grenade. And if you get lucky and nobody gets hurt, it still makes a big mess out of the floor.
I haven't seen them do it across the garage portion of a house slab, since those are usually poured after the house so they get the slope right - but they could. You HAVE to know nowadays before drilling into concrete, especially if you plan to go all the way through.
They are supposed to put the tension cables at the center of the slab at least two inches in from the finished surface, so a standard Red-Head or wedge anchor would be no problem - drilling past the two-inch mark is where you start taking big chances, and have to know what type floor it is before you start drilling.
Go look around the perimeter of the slab, there will be 2" round patches spaced regularly along the edges - that's where they tension it into a wedge wire-grip, and then cut off the loose end of the cable and plug the hole. Unfortunately, then they go and stucco over the edges so you can't see them. You need the building plans to be sure.
If you ever have to drill large holes through the slab, say for an electrical service that has burned up in the conduit blocking the pipe and you can't get it out, (Been there, Dealt with that...) you HAVE TO have the slab checked with X-ray or Ground Penetrating Radar to get the exact location of the cables before drilling or cutting.
They will paint markings on the concrete where it is safe to drill, where the tension cables and regular rebar is.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 18:39:13 GMT, Bruce L. Bergman

Good point for those who don't know what is in the slab. I was present when mine was poured. It is separate (100') from the house. Half inch rebar on 12" spacing. I'll count on hitting one of those.
I have another slab about 20' from my shop back door that used to have a grain bin on it. It is at least 6" thick. My air compressor is on it now. I'm going to place my forge and anvil on it also. Maybe I can find room on a corner for a socket for the bender. Or if I decide to put it outside, just set a pipe post in the ground with a mount at ground level.
Thanks for all the comments.
--Andy Asberry-- ------Texas-----
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On 17 Jan 2007 08:33:46 -0800, "Too_Many_Tools"

<Snip>
And that's exactly why I mentioned it - If you don't keep it at the back of your mind, you might end up with the /front/ of your mind going through it, at speed...
"And you know how painful that can be..."
You won't hit this on Industrial Buildings, they expect those floors to be modified occasionally for people bringing in Big Presses and Big Lathes that need their own footings. But Post-tensioned is a cheap way to build those condo slabs and parking garages, save on concrete and rebar for the same spans and loads.
And I have seen them do partial post-tension on new house slabs - not every foot all the way across, but they do two cables around the perimeter, and every eight feet or so in the field - just enough to keep running cracks from getting started.
And the concrete beams in the "Precast" parking structures that they truck in and plop in place, those are post-tensioned in the beam members also. There are probably safe areas to drill at the 'floor' areas between two sections, but you need to check with the company that cast those structural members before you do anything to them.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Some slabs are domes. Thin in the center and thick on the edges. Helps in slab strength from cracking - so I heard. But also reduces load limits...
I think I'd rely on a hole and epoxy for a stud or a threaded hole. Those sound best and then as stated before put a hex screw to keep out dirt.
martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Bruce L. Bergman wrote:

-
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