anti seize

What are the different applications for the 2 different antiseize compounds commonly available. One is gray colored and the other is
copper based. Most of my stuff is aluminum with stainless fasteners around salt water, which would be better. I thought copper would cause aluminum to corrode around salt water.
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wrote:

Actually, if you are using stainless fasteners in aluminum in a salt water environment you want an insulator since the problem is really galvanic corrosion. They make special stuff but I have also used 3M 5200 successfully and others say that loktite works.
I don't remember the name of the insulating stuff but most chandleries should stock it. Don't use the copper bearing antiseize.
Cheers,
Bruce in Bangkok (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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Either the lead based (grey) or the copper based anti-seize works well in a salt water environment. They both provide two essential properties anti galling lubrication and a moisture barrier. Although other products like sealants provide a moisture barrier, they do not provide the high pressure lubrication anti-seize offers. This is important to note especially in a stainless bolt in a stainless hole. Steve

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Stainless is stainless only so long as there is sufficient oxygen available. If you have a deep threaded hole with screw, both stainless, wetted with seawater, the stainless steel will rust like mild steel.
Google for "stainless crevice corrosion" (without the quotes).
Complete embedment using low-strength loctite may be the better solution.
Joe Gwinn
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I've heard the copper based is the 'worst' to use on aluminum, the grey goo is usually a triple formula of aluminum-copper- and somethingorother.
The 'best' for steel-aluminum is supposedly zinc-based anti-seize.
The triple-base grey goo seems to work OK on aluminum-steel.
Dave
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On Mon, 18 May 2009 06:19:52 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The grey stuff I use is a nickel-based compound; it supposedly works at higher temps than the copper stuff, but most of the mechs here prefer the copper. I use the copper all the time on my spark plug threads (steel into Al heads), and have had no problems in 20+ years.
Joe
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Yeah, I was skeptical too, and have not seen problems with the copper based stuff.
It might be more of a problem where you have, say, a long steel bolt going through an aluminum hole, and there is not enough heat to drive out moisture.
Dave
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