sch 80 copper pipe source?

Anyone know a source for 1/2" sch 80 copper pipe? We lost our source and are
facing having to drill solid stock in up to 38" lengths. The size is .840 OD
, .149 wall.
Dixon
Reply to
Dixon
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I *think* this is the place I bought a length of 3/8" sch 80 copper for a job several years ago...
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If they can't help, I can dig thru the job folder for clues.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Bingo! Just got off the phone with them, all set. $17.20 / foot. Ouch, but better than the alternative. Thanks, Dixon
Reply to
Dixon
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Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Check with local wholesale pool supply houses - you are supposed to use 1/2" Brass Electrical Conduit between the deck box and the wet niche on a pool light. And it costs a bloody fortune.
(Small electrical houses don't stock it, that's more of a "Pools Only" item. The big ones may, if they have regular calls for it.)
Price is probably why they are starting to allow PVC conduit for pool lights, as long as the niche is properly bonded to the pool steel. The light has a ground in the cord.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Have you seen what chlorinated/salt pool water can do to brass? It ain't pretty... The zinc dissolves, & you are left with a sponge of copper, having no strength at all. That's why marine applications always specify bronze (tin/copper), not brass. I would think plain copper would be much better than brass around a pool.
Reply to
David R Brooks
Deep hole drilling copper? Oh, that must be a lot of fun. :(
Having thought a second, would you rate that easier or harder than doing the same in 12L14?
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
I know that, and so do they - but even though the industry is stuck on calling it 'brass conduit', it probably is a marine bronze alloy.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
The whole brass/bronze, zinc/tin thing is a mess. If you look in the dictionary it'll likely agree with the above, but things aren't so simple in the real world.
85-5-5-5 (85% copper, 5% zinc, 5% tin, 5% lead) is sometimes referred to as red brass, and other times as naval bronze. I was in the marine hardware manufacturing business for many years, and the majority of our underwater products were eighty-five-three-five.
The balance, those where high strength was required, were manganese bronze, which can be as much as 40% zinc. Propellors, struts, linkages, etc., are often manganese bronze. Manganese bronze is somewhat prone to dezincification, but not nearly as bad as alloy 260 (common yellow brass, cartridge brass), which is only around 30% zinc.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
What do you know, bus pipe! That's exactly what I was using the copper pipe in my earlier post for. About 4000 amps thru a ~5/8" OD conductor. Don't forget to to turn the cooling water on.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
It's not to bad if you use a lot of coolant and take your time. There are worse mat'ls, nothing much worse than inconel imo. Now that I think about it, I had to clean up some superalloy rounds on the od once that contained a ceramic powder, that wore out carbide so fast, the insert had to be changed every 1/2" of length. Luckily the 3" bar just had to be skinned off. No dimension or tolerance. Dixon
Reply to
Dixon
Even the bronzes are here and there. There is an expensive Naval Bronze that is better than hot salt water capable Bronze.
I have some Naval Bronze that was under warm salt water for 50 years and other than some coral attached and patina the edges are sharp and square.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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David R Brooks wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

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