WTB one fully threaded 5/8-11 bolt

I have a need to buy a 5/8-11 bolt that is fully threaded. 1" is
fine. If you have a longer bolt, I can obviously cut it down to
size. If you have anything like that, and can sell it for not too
much, let me know. I need just one, no reason to buy a "pack of 25"
from McMaster.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27187
Loading thread data ...
forget my question, sorry, found something
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27187
Sounds like you are talking to yourself!
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
'Course there is. See any industrial supplier. Why do you think there's none?
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
Have you never heard of BSW?
Reply to
mark
I know you have already found something, but here's my answer anyway:
Get bolt and a nut. Thread nut onto bolt until correct amount of threads protrude. Cut off bolt with nut in place so you have what you want. Weld top side of nut to shank.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------------
Ignoramus27187 wrote:
Reply to
spaco
The relevance of your question eludes me.
Reply to
Tom
Try looking up the standard threads that are available in 5/8"x11tpi.
Hint, there are two.
Mark Rand TYFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Try considering ignaramus123456789's geographic situation.:-US Try considering that due to his geographic position that the chances of him wanting "BSW" set screws fairly remote, in fact taking Iggie's limited engineering experience, chance would be a fine thing if he even knew what BSW stood for. Let's face from a OEM situation it has been dead as a fastener since the 1950s. Try considering that the size of 5/8" x 11 tpi is common in the US as National Coarse series, SAE Coarse series and since 1949 as UNC.
Hint? Try considering that BSW was a "standard" thread.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Is still a standard thread, even if deprecated. Is one of the TWO standard threads of that diameter and pitch, how does that tie in with "No such animal"?
PS, I have machine tools that use BSW, BSF, UNC, UNF, BA, ISO metric coarse and fine. I don't rule out any thread form that fits the diameter and pitch just because it might emanate from a different continent.
regards Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Really? So how many British manufacturers do you know that still specify BSW fasteners as "standard" in the assembly of their goods?
Really? Can't you count? Going on "your" definition of "standard" there would be at least 4 of US origin. However, by my definition, only one standard in current manufacturing usage.
how does that tie in with "No such animal"?
As I said, it doesn't, the discussion as I recall is between "fully threaded bolts" and set screws, please pay attention, the thread form is entirely irrelevant.
55º Whitworth or 60º Unified form it's all the same to you? Hardly the attitude of one supposedly espousing something as "standard".
Tom
Reply to
Tom

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