Any one using 3D printing for metalwork

Last evening I went to a beginners class on 3D printing. The class was using a program by Autodesk called " 123D Design " to create files for 3D printing. Looks like a pretty good program especially considering that the program is free.
The local library will print a 3D object for free as long as it does not take more than 5 hours to print and you accept whatever color they are using.
Looks like it would be easy to print up a pattern to use in casting parts.
If you search on 123D Design , you will find some additional programs to use for things as scanning an object and creating a duplicate by 3 D printing.
So is anyone doing anything with 3D printing?
Dan
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I have one a three color head. There are some design flaws in this model. I'm going to re-engineer it and depopulate to two heads and if required one head. Three heads have fist size servo motors and they move as one. It can rock a metal tubing table easily.
I have it on four concrete piers - and a 4" sheet of sandstone. The back up to the table.
It is a work in progress, and I just got a new OS and design tools.
I've been moving into my new office and getting my engraver sorted out.
Martin
On 10/21/2015 8:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

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I sent a email to some of the people at the museum about 3D printing and go t a reply asking if one can 3D print 3D autocad drawings. A quick search f ound a number of sites that told how simple it was to do that. Looks like you could go the other direction and import a .stl file into Autocad.
Dan
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On Thu, 22 Oct 2015 06:31:24 -0700 (PDT)

You can glean some info from Shapeways website too:
http://www.shapeways.com/creator/tools
If you get something developed you would like to sell they can do that too. Edward Falk who sometimes posts here (haven't seen him lately) has an item he made there:
http://www.shapeways.com/designer/eafalk
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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On Wednesday, October 21, 2015 at 9:40:42 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

Pure logic would tell me that jon_banquer, Ed Huntress or Joe Gwinn are (or might as well be), so I'd ask them specifically. As for me, I don't personally know (because I'm more into high and low voltage wiring and 18w truck driving, etc...)
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On Thu, 22 Oct 2015 14:14:04 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Dan says he wants to hear from someone who is doing it. I'm studying it.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Thursday, October 22, 2015 at 6:08:37 PM UTC-4, Ed Huntress wrote:

Actually I am interested in hearing from those doing it, but also those tha t have decided it is not worthwhile, and even from those that are studying it.
Since the museum has two people who know Autocad, I think they will find us es. But someone here may have some insights into ways it can be used that I would not think of. Or experiences with places that will do the printing from your file. Or experiences with building a 3D printer.
Right now I am in the learn the big picture mode. But could get into speci fics if we start to use it.
Dan
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On Fri, 23 Oct 2015 07:42:33 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

I have little to offer here. My focus is on the big commercial printers, mainly laser-sintering machines for metal.
It sounds like you're on the right track, though. A simple modeler that produces STL files should be all you need. It's great that your library has that machine!
Oh, and you're right, making patterns for casting is one of the original uses for 3D printing. Also, some people use some type of wax or plastic made for the purpose, and make investment-casting patterns. I've never looked into it, though.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Friday, October 23, 2015 at 11:57:21 AM UTC-4, Ed Huntress wrote:

I did a little looking around. The material used for investment casting is PLA. Made from Soy Beans. The regular material gives toxic fumes when being melted out.
Dan
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snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

Back around 1980- there was a 3d printing technique using laminated layers of paper that was big in pattern making but CNC machining soon pushed it aside.
Today most of the metal casting using 3d printing is in the jewelry making business. Not much for foundry casting.
Z-corp makes a 3d printer that prints objects made of sand. Its used for making sand molds and cores for making prototype or one-off castings. http://www.zcorp.com/zcorp/casting-material.html
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GM has built cars with large 3D printers. Engines and all. They can get a new curve or bend or fit the next day.
24 hour turn around and not cutting blocks of clay over and over.
Martin
On 10/23/2015 5:00 PM, jim wrote:

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ABS and Nylon are the standard other than PLA.
My small hand unit uses ABS and PLA and wood... I got it going tonight. My birthday present (early naturally).
3Ddoodler
Seems useable and even for patching other designs as the tip melts and it is like filling with putty so voids can be filled and sanded over.
It also makes 2d and some wire frame or nearly shell 3D.
Martin
On 10/23/2015 1:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

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Early on when this stuff was being invented and the printer was a hacked dot matrix machine under a mare's nest of tubes and cables, late 80s maybe, I saw an experimental setup at MIT. They were printing with glue and steel spherules. After sintering, the result was put in a puddle of another metal (bronze? brass?) in an oven. The molten metal was drawn into the interstices by osmosis. I don't think it was a very successful technique but I haven't kept up on the subject.

I've heard that complex pattern-welded billets are being made by 3D printing differeing steel grains, sintering, then fusing at a welding heat and/or under a press. Didn't get the details.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

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On 23 Oct 2015 15:51:28 -0300, Mike Spencer

Oh, man, that should be great for making machined-billet brake pedal arms and such, for people you wish wouldn't show up for work in the morning!
Speaking of exotic metals, here's one from Boeing that they describe as he "Lightest. Metal. Ever." It will be appreciated by some in this group because it's 99% air:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6N_4jGJADY

--
Ed Huntress

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If you get it printed in PLA - the low level plastic can be dissolved out and anything left burnt in mold generation. Or if you are into green sand directly Make the part.
The Ring industry is into this exact function. They make blanks with details that are refined and polished up pretty.
Martin
On 10/21/2015 8:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

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