Anybody here done electroless nickel?

I bought the kit from Caswell for electroless nickel. So, before I do
the first piece I'm looking for anybody who has done this at home and
might have pointers for doing brass. It seems to be real simple but
there may be tips that will help insure a good job.
Eric
Reply to
Eric R Snow
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Eric, it depends on how you perceive of "insure a good job".
I haven't worked with the Caswell electroless nickel process, but I have dealt with quite a few other electroless processes for depositing copper, tin, and gold. All were adequate for the purposes for which they were sold, but realize that this is simply to lay down a surface layer only a few atoms thick to temporarily color and protect the surface of the base metal on which they are deposited, or to prepare them for some subsequent electroplating. I am assuming that the Caswell electroless nickel is no different.
Hope this helps.
Harry C.
Reply to
hhc314
Don't know anything about the Caswell process or for that mater very much about the process the company I worked for about 30 years ago, ( Haller Raymond and Brown ) but I do know that we used electroless nickle to plate up quite a good thickness on Aluminium IR scanners. These were up to 10 inches diameter with 4 faces opticall polished after plating and lasted for years. As I remember it the processing was done in a normal lab and couldn't have been very difficult. Must have been fairly thick, at least a thou or so to have stood the optical polishing after. Let us know your results. ...lew...
Reply to
lew hartswick
Just follow the directions. I have occasionally had trouble getting brass to start in electroless nickel, other times had no problem. I never did figure it out. Caswell says to touch the brass with something made of steel to get it started. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn't. ???
My electroless stuff is pretty old, so the chemistry might have changed since I got it.
Reply to
Don Foreman
The Caswell manual says that it will plate .001 thick. Or thicker. Not what I'd call a few atoms thick. So the Caswell stuff is different. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Thanks Don, That's just what I was looking for. Eric
Reply to
Eric R Snow
I watched a gunsmith friend do some 1911 frames several years ago. His main comment was that when he first started his results were inconsistent. Turned out his problem was the water. He was using distilled, deionized water; sometimes the plating just didn't stick. A chemist friend of his got him a carboy of Reagent Grade water which he has used ever since. No more problems. Clean, clean, clean, and clean.
Reply to
keith bowers
I believe the Caswell instructions say to use distilled, not de-ionized water. Maybe those ions help out. Eric
Reply to
Eric R Snow

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