bandsaw cutting a Teflon coated cookie sheet?

I have a "professional weight steal" premium nonstick cookie sheet
that I might like to cut. My band saw has a metal cutting blade
installed.
I'm not concerned about handling the cookie sheet while cutting. In
case anyone happens to know, I'm wondering if the Teflon might
chip/peel/whatever, and whether the steel should cut easily enough.
I have a good rotary tool as an alternative cutting tool.
I do not want to test cutting the thing. If cutting might be a
problem, I probably will just buy a more appropriate size cookie
sheet for my application (optical mouse pad).
Thank you.
Reply to
John Doe
Loading thread data ...
Cutting sheetmetal with any type of saw is a little more complicated than cutting thick stock.
For sheetmetal on a bandsaw, jig or scroll saw, you'll most likely achieve better results and less blade damage if the sheetmetal is backed-up with a dense material similar to hardboard or masonite. Gluing the metal to the backer works well.
The steel sheet you have may not cut very well with tinsnips for your purpose, because there will be some distortion at the cut, then the sheet won't be completely flat.
WB ............
Reply to
Wild Bill
John Doe wrote in news:Xns968E75E0489C3wisdomfolly@207.115.63.158:
Teflon is not actually bonded to the pan chemically speaking. The pan is sand blasted to roughen up the surface, then a primer is applied, then the Teflon. The Teflon get into the nooks and crannies created by the sand blasting, and as it cures it "grabs" the rough surface. If you get it too hot it will let go of the surface.
You should be able to cut it with a band saw, which may cause a little peeling near the edge. I would sandwich it between some wood which should help. Cut with the good side up. The big thing to avoid is getting it too hot. Which seems unlikely on a bandsaw, but might happen if you power sand or grind the edges after.
Reply to
D Murphy
Dunno your application, but MSC sells Teflon sheets treated to be gluable on one side. Works great with ordinary epoxy.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Mousepad for my new optical/laser mouse.
Do you have a link for that, or more details please. I do not know what the acronym stands for or where to get Teflon sheets.
I just bought another, very heavy duty cookie sheet with a smoother/glossy surface. Number one priority is glide, the slicker the better. Unfortunately it is even bigger. I will probably go on a serious shopping trip to some bakeware store.
Thanks.
Reply to
John Doe
Try
formatting link
and do a search for "bondable teflon sheet".
Dave Young
John Doe wrote:
Reply to
Dave Young
Didja try the mouse on the teflon first to make sure it can see that surface?
They're sure a slick mouse, no problems with crud buildup, etc.
John
Reply to
JohnM
MSC ->
formatting link
Another option, nearly as slippery, less expensive, and available with an adhesive backing is UHMW polyethylene. Try McMaster part number 1441T11
formatting link
McMaster will also have the prepared teflon.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
...
The cordless laser mouse works on both Teflon surfaces so far. I'm not familiar with ordinary optical mice. A brief skipping issue was easily resolved by repositioning the receiver.
The fact it will slide around easier given the right surface should more than make up for the slight weight increase over my old cordless ball mouse.
Reply to
John Doe
I agree with WB. You need to back it up with something, plywood would work. The problem is that you can hardly get blades with enough teeth per inch to always have a tooth or two in the work. I don't think you need to glue the backer to the sheet metal. Use as fine toothed blade as you have. Try it out on a tin can for a test cut. You will need to smooth it out with a file after the cut, but that should not take long.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Any chance you can angle the sheet? I think it might cut nicer if you were positioning the sheet face up and with one end higher than the other so that there is more blade in contact with the sheet in the cut. and also as others have suggested clamp it between 2 pieces of wood to help reduce chipping out of the teflon.
Doug
Reply to
Doug Schultz

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.