Battlebots Good Weapon Material?


?
6AL4V = 6% aluminum, 4%vanadium, balance titanium. the most widely used "aircraft" titanium alloy. 6AL4V ELI = extra low interstitial elements. A "cleaner" form of 6AL4V used for medical purposes mostly Grade 2: commercially pure titanium. i believe it's 99.6% pure with grade 1 being 99.9, grade 4 being 99.0?
Gene
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1
Matweb says Grade 1 = 99.5% Ti, with maximum impurities of: C max 0.1
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Oops, sent early.

grade
Matweb.com says Grade 1 = 99.5% Ti, with maximum impurities of: C max 0.1, Fe Max 0.2, H Max 0.015, N Max 0.03, O Max 0.18 Grade 2 = 99.2% with looser tolerances on Fe and O content. Grade 3 = 99.1% with Fe Max 0.3%, N Max 0.05% and O Max 0.35% (rest same as before). Grade 4 is 99.0% Ti with looser tolerances on Fe and O. All are rated between 24 and 80KSI yield and 35 to 80KSI max tensile, with about 15% elongation and 30% reduction in area (about 1030 or 1040 steel but half the density).
According to the references, this comes from _Materials Properties Handbook: Titanium Alloys_ (1994) and _Structural Alloys Handbook_, 1996 ed.
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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er, thats what I meant :-)

but
Handbook:
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gene lewis wrote:

Thanks - normally I can find the composition but the use is sometimes not clear.
Martin
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AJ
I first read your post with alot of interest when I thought you were spinning a big piece of steel and wanted to make an improvement. I was interested in seeing the preliminary results. Then you seemed less than gratefull to the RCM for the replies to your post. Frankly I was surprized to leard that you'd spent $7,000.00 on a project that hadnt been tested with at least one "bl;ade". I suppose I was a bit too critical about your error in having posted 3,000 RPM and 250 MPH. But you could easily have accepted that remark of mine without asking if I wanted a gold star. I consider that an attempt to disrespect me. Correct me if I misunderstood.
You sure dont have to prove anything to me and probably not to "this group". But, when you post to this group that you have a robot project that we are invited to contribute money to, there might be some indication that you are actually building something. The way In read it, the general nature of your thread has been that of a salesman.
I wonder what your objective was to write that you take a NASA approach then reject that that car leaf spring suggestion. I dont see how a leaf spring violated your specification.
Jerry

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On Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:38:00 GMT, "Jerry Martes"
......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Hear here, Jerry! Well summarized.
I have asked questions here and then questioned the replies, to the point of being censured...by some of the more prickly members <G>. But I have never simply rejected, rubbished, or ignored them.

..........
.........
...........
........
Now here I disagree. NASA would never accept the car leaf spring......to easy and cheap! <G>
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You forgot reliable. (:
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<snip>

OK, the web site was instructive. It's a bunch of high school geeks, obviously not doing this on their own dime. Explains a lot about the attitude and apparent lack of experience.
AJ, The robot stuff will teach you a lot, but judging from your replies, you need to work on those interpersonal skills. The folks on here could teach you a lot, too, if you pay attention. Tim Williams is also a cocky young fellow, but he's done a lot I admire with (I suspect) nowhere near the infusion of cash.
If you need more money for your robot, team shirts, travel and party expenses, etc., ask your parents. I fund my teenager's experiments in blacksmithing, etc. for the hands-on learning experience for him. Beats all nighters on on-line rpg's.
Pete Keillor
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[...]

http://www.ajquick.com/gallery/me/index.php
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proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
I will "digest" what has been said here, and add one idea.
The one idea: quench and tempered steel. You will need to get this cut from sheet, probably. Best with laser. This stuff makes spring steel look like cookie dough! <G>. Its yield strength is enormous. The 350 Bn hard stuff has a "0.2% proof stress" (which I have been told is equivalent to Yield) of around 1100-1200 MPa. 500 is even higher.
Definition Proof Stress: The stress that will cause a specified small, permanent extension of a tensile test piece. Commonly the stress to produce 0.2% extension is quoted in N/mm2 for steel. This value approximates to the yield stress in materials not exhibiting a definite yield point.
They are just machinable, and are weldable, with lots of care. they can be bent. They must not be heated beyond very set levels, because they are already fully treated.
Then George mentioned pivoting. The force on _your_ bot (pun intended) will be enormous if another bot stops that bar, even if you slice into it a few inches. The drive shaft and gearing will need to be some serious stuff, or you need a good clutch. Try a rotating pan, with pivoting blades a la slashers and rotary mowers. The boits I have seen with rotary cutters had multiple teeth to have a similar effect.
Ernie mentioned hardened tips on strong bar. I again suggest the 350-500 hardness grades of QnT alloys. Tips should then be chosen for hardness and extreme impact. From my (limited and often theoretical) experience, this places the stuff you need into about the 600 650 Bn range at max, or it starts to shatter too easily above that.........ah! I see on http://www.matchrockets.com/teamstupid/materials.html
that they recommend S7 treated to 55 Rc. Roughly the same. Perhaps I was a little high, and getting toward brittle.

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proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Aiiii amd a Dalek. I will now ignore you.
Ignorrre! Ignorrre! Ignorrre!

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