Before you hire a rigger

I posted this to another thread and thought it might be helpful to
others as well.
Mart>When you get a rigger - make sure they know what they are expected to do BEFORE agreeing.
You might have the wrong type of rigger. You want them to come with
the correct equipment.<
And I said:
The MOST important thing to remember when checking out a company doing
rigging is : GET A COPY OF THEIR CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE.
With the proper insurance you'll usually find they're a legitimate
company; no legitimate company will subject you, or themselfs, to the
risk of NOT having insurance.
They should be able to show you proof of: 1. Liability insurance
including medical liability. 2. Property damage insurance covering
machinery. 3. Workers Compensation insurance.
The value of the first two are self evident, the last even more
serious. If a worker were to be injured and the employer not have
insurance you may find yourself (and maybe your insurance company)
holding the bag. This could amount to a VERY large amount of money the
way the courts are handing it out these days. Your liability will vary
from state to state.
Ask for, and receive, a current certificate of insurance BEFORE giving
out the job.
I used to tell my customers the main difference between riggers moving
machinery and a company, or individual, moving machinery was insurance.
I still stand behind that statement.
dennis
in nca
Reply to
rigger
Loading thread data ...
And how does a legitimate certificate of insurance look? And how can I verify that insurance is in fact given to the person presenting it?
For example, let's say someone says that they are an insured rigger from company XYZ. And shows a copy of insurance certificate. What is this person is taking a day of from his job at XYZ trying to make a buck on his own? That would not be an covered situation, if something happens.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19198
Your e-mail address says it all...
Reply to
Clif Holland
Iggy asked:
I verify that insurance is in fact given to the person presenting it?
For example, let's say someone says that they are an insured rigger from company XYZ. And shows a copy of insurance certificate. What is this person is taking a day of from his job at XYZ trying to make a buck on his own? That would not be an covered situation, if something happens.<
You can ask for the name of the insurance broker and give them a call if it looks funny. Most agents will send the certificate directly to you (ain't fax wonderful?). The date of the certificate (not the policy) should be current, which should help protect against a cancelled policy.
dennis in nca
Reply to
rigger
That's a pretty good answer. I will be sure to remember this if I need to hire a rigger. Thank you.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19198
Duh, well, Iggy, when I call my local riggers, I call the office, generally after looking up their number in the yellow pages (since I don't call them all that often.) Since I call the office to arrange the work, I have a reasonable expectation of getting the services of the company, not the services of some guy working on the side. They show up in a company truck, and the company sends me a bill, which I pay to the company, via check in the mail.
If you slink around in back alleys calling "here rigger, here rigger" while waving cash around, you'll get all the rigging you deserve...or mugged.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
I was thinking about auction like situations...
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19198
I AM A RIGGER.
I learned in the Gulf of Mexico. I am Offshore Petroleum Institute certified.
That don't mean squat, though.
If I go do work for someone, I can mess up, the rigging can mess up, or Murphy's Law can jump up.
Yes, insurance is the difference.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
It works like this with contractors, or at least in my state where I was a steel erection contractor for nine years.
The person/company wanting to have the work done says, "I want proof of insurance." I have to then contact my insurance carrier and ask that THEY send that company proof DIRECTLY. I never touch the correspondence. The proof is mailed directly from the insurer to the company requesting the work.
Avoid anyone who will "give" you a COPY of their insurance certificate. They can be made in five minutes on a computer, or in less on a copy machine with some White Out.
LEARN as a consumer how it works in YOUR state, and follow the procedures EXACTLY.
Being informed on how it works is your best friend.
HTH
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Thanks Steve, that's very helpful. Sometimes it helps to be a little paranoid.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19198
Steve tells us:
>I AM A RIGGER.
Reply to
rigger
"Ignoramus19198" wrote
If it is paranoid to be cautious about something that you can have your butt sued off for, I guess I am REALLY paranoid.
But, hey, people don't just sue at the drop of a hat with no reason today, do they? Nah. People who think that must be paranoid.
Now, I'm going back to the closet and curl up under my bankie and listen for the silent invisible black helicopters .............
Steve ;-)
Reply to
SteveB
I attended that OSHA sanctioned OPI school. I also completed in house schools at Reading and Bates Drilling Company, and with Teamster's Local 631, Las Vegas. I was a commercial diver for six years. I ran a 30 ton crane on an offshore platform for two years. I worked in oil derrick erection for about a year and a half. (scary stuff)
I got a lot of hands on experience, experience from seeing things done wrong, and some out of books.
There are people who can talk rigging, then there are those of us who will go out, hook it up, and make the lift. And get it right. And be safe.
I miss the tension, the excitement, the POWER.
About the only thing I have done that is more exciting or empowering is working with explosives. That was at a grunt level of setting them underwater, but hey, we got to touch them, and most everyone else was forbidden within 20 feet.
I miss the adventure, too. High seas. Spartan living conditions. Heavy dangerous work. Comraderie with guys who would jump in to save you without thinking.
I'm glad I lived through it (some didn't).
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
You don't want to be dealing with no broke rigga...........
Reply to
ATP*
The *only* thing that counts is an ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE from THE INSURER or their AGENT, listing YOU AS A PARTY. COPIES DO NOT COUNT, POLICY PAPERWORK DOES NOT COUNT, NOTHING BUT AN ORIGINAL WITH YOUR NAME ON IT. THIS IS HOW THE BUSINESS WORKS. If he has in fact paid for insurance, then he will be more than willing to proudly give you such a certificate. Or rather, have it sent, since it comes from the insurer, not the insured.
An assertion, verbal or written, but lacking a certificate, from the insured that he carries insurance is worse than worthless. because he is evading the normal certification process, which is highly suspect.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
"Richard J Kinch" wrote
Absolutely correct.
STeve
Reply to
SteveB
It seems most of the world is mis-informed about what type of protection workers comp insurance provides a "customer."
Workers Comp provides protection to the "EMPLOYER." An employee cannot sue an amployer for work related injury, thats where workers comp comes in. An injured worker CAN sue the premises he was injured on. So you hire a rigger, his employee falls down the stairs in your building, the employee can sue you.
So if you get a workers comp certificate from a contractor, its nice, but it doesn't protect you a bit.
Tony
BEFORE agreeing.
Reply to
Tony
My understanding is that the worker always has that option of suing the property owner. But doesn't it stand to reason that the worker will be more likely to sue if he has no coverage at all? He would almost be forced to sue to cover his medical costs alone.
Reply to
ATP*
Pretty broad statement, and one size does NOT fit all. States and jurisdictions vary GREATLY.
BTW, where did you get your law degree from?
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
A piece of paper is a piece of paper. I know some sheep think an original piece of paper is equivalent to the word of god, but sorry it is just a piece of paper, no different than what you use to wipe your rear.
My favorite rigger has his insurance certificate on his web page. It shows the insurer's name, address and phone number and it shows his policy number. I can get the insurer's real phone number from their own web page or from the phone book, call them up, give them the policy number, and then quiz them to my satisfication.
My favorite rigger charges an arm and leg. But if I want the job done right and safe, I go to them.
Sheep and their paper.
Reply to
AL

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