Books: Threading & Making Gears On A Lathe

Does anyone have recommendations for books concerning how to threadon a lathe, and also books on how to make gears on a lathe?
I know that doing the latter on a lathe is not common, but if there are any books on this subject, I'd appreciated the titles.
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

The "Workshop Practice" series of books from Nexus Special Interests in UK do exactly what you need:
"Screwcutting in the Lathe" by Martin Cleeve (ISBN 0-85242-838-3) "Gears and Gear Cutting" by Ivan Law (ISBN 0-85242-911-8)
I can recommend both of them both.
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Regards, Gary Wooding
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wrote:

Other than making the basic gear shape (OD and center hole) I can't think how a lathe would be useful unless you want to make it look like a mill by putting a tool in the chuck and adding some kind of gear blank holder / indexer onto the cross slide.
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xray wrote:

Gear hobbing can be done on a lathe. Bob
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wrote:

Which of course is how it's done. And this is not unusual. Especially for small work and work done by model makers and amateur machinists. Furthermore, extremely high quality work is done this way. In fact, you really need a lathe to begin making other machine tools. It would be nice to have separate machines for each function, e.g. turning, milling, shaping, and grinding. In fact, I have all these machines because I'm in business making parts for money. But the work put out by amateurs can be very precise and beautiful. Just because a person's complete machine shop is located in a closet in the spare bedroom of their apartment and is dominated by a lathe does not mean that that lathe won't be useful for every aspect of machining. Basically a lathe is just a spinning mandrel onto which all sorts of things are hung. Even though we may say that when the part is spun and the tool is not that this is lathe work, who's to say that ANY work done on a lathe is not lathe work? When the part is spun, and the tool, a grinding wheel, is also spun, does this mean that it is no longer lathe work? Has the lathe turned into a grinder? Or is now a lathe with a grinding attachment? The part is still being turned. If the part is sanded on the lathe then the tool is not spinning. Is it grinding, sanding, or turning? Cheers, eric
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.con.com wrote:

The "Workshop Practice" series of books from Nexus Special Interests in UK do exactly what you need:
"Screwcutting in the Lathe" by Martin Cleeve (ISBN 0-85242-838-3) "Gears and Gear Cutting" by Ivan Law (ISBN 0-85242-911-8)
I can recommend both of them as excellent.
--
Regards, Gary Wooding
(To reply by email, change feet to foot in my address)
  Click to see the full signature.
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