Clausing 220V Table Saw

I have an opportunity to pick up a Clausing 220V 10-inch table saw for $100.
Can anyone tell me if it is a good idea to run one of these off a step-
up transformer?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Srarten Island, New York.
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Are you trolling here! Or do you live so far out in the boonies you don't have residential 220V power available?
Bob (usu. can smell trolls) Swinney
I have an opportunity to pick up a Clausing 220V 10-inch table saw for $100.
Can anyone tell me if it is a good idea to run one of these off a step- up transformer?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Srarten Island, New York.
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2008 13:56:30 -0700, Searcher7 wrote:

Something like http://newyork.craigslist.org/que/tls/727715659.html ? The motor looks like maybe 3 HP, which would run at about 25A into the 120V side of a 120-to-240 transformer. You won't find 25A 120V circuits in ordinary residential circuit breaker boxes, and trying to run it on a 15A or 20A circuit probably would be hopeless.
If your apartment has its own circuit breaker box with room for more breakers, it's a simple matter to add a 20A 240V circuit. (While the craigslist ad says 220V, it might actually mean 240V. But if not, and if you are talking about stepping 240 down to 220, don't bother, just run it on 240.) I assume that in your "Srarten Island" NYC apartment you are required to hire a licensed electrician to plug in a breaker, but if not you can buy appropriate wires, breakers and plugs at Ace, Lowe's, or any good electrical supplier.
This saw looks like a great buy but probably is quite loud!
-jiw
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James Waldby wrote:

I'll second that last comment. Probably a great buy and a bit loud, but perhaps he has an out building / detached garage with his apartment. He doesn't say if it's a single phase or three phase motor - and it could be either. Assuming single phase he should have no problem at all getting it to run on his 110/220, 115/230 or 120/240 volt house current. He could have 115/230 in the apartment but only 115 at the "shop" he plans to put it into. Most motors / appliances have about a 10% voltage tolerance built in. I seriously doubt he only has 115 volt current in his apartment - but it is possible, especially in an aging "add on" apartment/converted garage or carport. IF this is the case then YES he could use a transformer with a 115 volt single phase primary and 230 volt single phase secondary. It would not be quite as efficient since no transformer has 100% efficiency. It is also possible that it's a dual voltage motor and can be reconnected for 115 volt. He'd have to be sure the circuit he installs it on is adequate for the FLA + 25% for starting load / continuous duty of that voltage.
Just my $0.02 but I hope it helps.
Al
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Might be a dual-voltage motor that can be connected for either 120V or 240V, look at the spec plate and it will say.
I wouldn't use a step-up transformer, you have to oversize it to handle the motor start surge without failing, and install a very heavy 120V circuit to feed it. Much simpler and cheaper to run new cable back to the main panel and install a 240V outlet in your shop area.
If you have an electric clothes dryer in the garage, you already have a 30-Amp 240V circuit right there - you can get the matching cord cap for the saw, unplug the dryer and plug in the saw to work. And plug the dryer back in to do laundry.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Jun 22, 4:27am, Bruce L. Bergman

Ignoring Robert.
James, Al, Bruce, thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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James Waldby wrote:

Could that Clausing table saw be an OEM Powermatic?
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I picked up the saw. 220v can be wired for 110v. Purrs like a kitten.
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