Impossible Screw

I am trying to fix a TV, but after getting 7 or the 8 screws out I've run into a road-block.
The screw is inset like a pocket screw because of the way the TV case is molded, but the head is definitely hex.
It does have the raised portion in the middle like what I know to require a security bit to turn, but for some reason nothing I have will cit snugly into it so I can turn.
The only option I have left is to drill it out and I was looking for suggestions. I would include a pic but I could take a good one because the screw is too deep.
Any ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
jamesjaddah1755
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What a disappointment. I thought I was going to read something about a girl named Veronica.
Reply to
Fred C. Dobbs
So, is it inch-size hex socket, or metric-size hex socket, or is it Torx? They all look hexagonal. I'd poke some clay into the hole, pull it out and examine under a microscope.
Reply to
whit3rd
Do you have one of the 100 pc HF security bit sets? That should have the correct bit in it. Mine has come in handy dozens of times.
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One of the best sawbucks you've ever spent.
You're on your own there. No piccy no helpee.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Had the exact same issue two weeks ago when the injector pump failed on the Johne Deere. it has a five point star with center pin bolts to remove the cutoff solenoid cover.
So, i took out my left hand drill set. Drill a bit, the drill catches and jacks the screw right out.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Go to Harbor Freight or even Ebay and buy their Security Screw bit set.
This one will cover about 99% of the screws.
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
What puzzles me, is that typically all the cover screws are the same. What worked on the others? I think Gunner has the idea. Go to HF, and buy a security bit set.
I've got a couple security bit sets, and they have been very useful.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus
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the 8 screws out I've run into a road-block.
the way the TV case is molded, but the head is definitely hex.
what I know to require a security bit to turn, but for some reason nothing I have will cit snugly into it so I can turn.
and I was looking for suggestions. I would include a pic but I could take a good one because the screw is too deep.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
I had a similar problem. I took an old common screwdriver and ground the blade narrow enough that it would fit the hex indentation and then ground a notch in the center of the blade to clear the "safety pin". After I got the screws out I replaced then with Phillips head screws.
Reply to
John B.
Now, that's a metalworking answer.
I got tired of wondering about the T-9 or whatever size of torx screws holding together my Motorola fRS walkie talkie. A couple minutes with a hex wrench and a bench grinder, I had a passable tool to remove the screws. I later bought a tool set off Ebay.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus
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Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Those screws are quite hard and brittle. Break the center pin.
Reply to
Boris Mohar
How about welding a bit of all-thread onto the screw head. Then double nut the all-thread to get the screw out.
Reply to
Brendon
Polymer clay works well for this.
The female procedure:
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Men can just hit it briefly with a propane torch.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Any time I've encountered screws in deep recessed holes on electronic equipment, the female end of a "bit" driver is too big to enter the hole, in which case, assorted security bits aren't the answer.
A long, thin (cheap) screwdriver blade can be filed to jam in the screw recess, allowing the screw to be coaxed out of the cabinet, otherwise the correct screwdriver is generally required.
The good aspect is that the screw is most likely embedded in plastic, not metal, since all external conductive parts have been required to be isolated from the chassis and/or circuitry.
As a non-ideal option, a Dremel-type cutter can be used to cut/rout around the opening of the hole at the outer surface, cutting thru the plastic. This will allow the rest of the cabinet to come away freely. Not something I'd do to someone else's equipment, but for free/salvage equipment, WTF.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
Ive run into a few instances where all the screws but for one or 2 were standard philip...the last couple were security screws.
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
5-point Torx with tamper pin is the same thing Leatherman uses, and other companies trying to send a message - " Warranty Void if you touch this."
Now if they are willing to do a Lifetime Warranty like Leatherman and are still in business, it's not too bad - you send your multi-tool in, and get it back all fixed up. Or a fresh one.
If you don't care about the warranty anymore because it's long gone, this practice is just plain rude.
Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)
The first thought which comes to mind is whether the screw might be a metric security Allen, instead of an inch one.
I believe that by now you have a digital caliper, so what I would suggest as a start is to push some putty into it, pull it out, and measure the across-the-flats dimension. If you have the digital calipers, you can switch back and forth between inch and metric to figure out which is the closest fit. (Take the inch dimension and repeatedly multiply by 2 until you come up with a number quite close to an integer. (Keep count of the number of multiplications so you know whether you are working with 64ths or 32nds. Or if it is metric, you will know that.
There are sets of security screws which have both inch and metric in the same kit. The set in my hand has security Allen bits ranging from 2mm to 6mm, and from 5/64" up to 5/32", plus some security Torx.
If you can't find a set like that, take an Allen wrench which would fit, saw off perhaps an inch of it, put it in the lathe, and drill the hole to clear that pin. Then drive it with a small socket of the proper size, or a nut driver, or whatever.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I know nothing about "Polymer clay" and all my metalworking equipment is currently packed away.
It seems that Karl Townsend's idea to use a drill is the best one since I have a reversible hammer drill.
What kind of drill bit should I use or pick up ro drill the screw?
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
jamesjaddah1755
Drilling a security screw CAN be "fun". Can't get the bit to "pick" the center. Would be OK if you could find a drill bit with a center hole, I guess.
Reply to
clare
Get a small flat blade screwdriver & grind or file it so it just fits and jams into the screw head. I've done this several times & it worked. Keep pressure on the driver as you try to undo the screw.
Reply to
Glenn B
That will be my first attempt.
It is difficult getting a good picture of the screw, and I can't be sure if the center of the screw head is convex or concave.
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It looks as though it is raised in the center, but I can't seem to feel that with a pick.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
jamesjaddah1755

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