Building A Work Bench

I would like to build a work bench to my specs and was hoping to get recommendations of the best materials(Wood, as well as Metal
fasteners) to use.
Outside of heavier being better, I'd appreciated advice on the specific kind of wood used by anyone who has done this.(I'd be bolting my mini-lathe and mini-mill to this).
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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Hardwood like Beech or Maple bolted onto angle iron welded frame.
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A lot easier and cheaper would be to find a used one, at industrial liquidations. Every closing factory has a few workbenches.
i
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On Thu, 01 Feb 2007 20:43:13 -0600, Ignoramus22134

Or a good, solid, steel desk with a couple layers of 3/4 ply on the top. Gives you a shitload fo storage as well.
Not one of those piece of shit Ikea monstrosities.but an old time honest Steelcase desk.
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
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I've built several out of 2x4's face glued together. I saw the best edge to get a square edge (no chamfer, no wanes) drill 7/16" holes 2" from the edge every 18", glue up with a gallon jug of Elmer's carpenter glue and 3/8" all thread rod to clamp it down. Finish with a belt or disk sander and a coat of varnish. I usually counter bore the front piece to allow the all thread to remain in the top but not snag the pants. Stick in some stubs to bolt the legs to if you want. Dimensions are open, you can use short 2x4's, just stagger the joints. Used lumber is fine also. My last one was when I got a great deal on some 6' 2x4s, wound up with a 9' bench that is solid as a rock.
Searcher7 wrote:

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I am building a bench right now; I happened to have some European Beech flooring material. I built the frame from 2x4 and 2x6; for the top surface I used a layer of 3/4 ply, then two layers of the beech, which is nominally 7/8 (actually 23mm) thick.
Then I wrapped the edges with a mitered pine band, made from 1x6 and 1x8; which was cut along the width to match the thickness of the top, for the most part. The band has some parts that dip down at the corners and centers; these are handholds to pull it around as it's on casters.
There's also a lower platform made of one layer of the beech for storage, which also has a 1x pine band that lips up above the surface to keep things from sliding out.
I used Deckmate construction screws for the frame and the initial layer of plywood; and 2" finish nails for the beech. The 1x pine band was glued and also nailed with 2" finish nails. The whole thing is very stiff and solid, and I especially like the beech surface as it's dense, smooth, and hard.
Next up is some rasping and sanding to soften the edges, some wood dye, varnish, and a couple vises.
--
Jedd Haas - Artist - New Orleans, LA
http://www.gallerytungsten.com
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I am ass-u-ming a lot here, so the advice is free and worth everything you paid for it.
Whatever your craft is, build it so that it is resistant to that work.
i.e. if you are welder, build it of materials that won't burn.
If you work with woods, make it of something other than particle board that won't go to pieces if it gets some kind of solvent soaked into it.
IOW, it's hard to tell what to make it out of without knowing what you are going to use it for.
Just analyze what may get on it that would degrade/deteriorate/destroy it, and choose materials that will resist those elements.
Steve
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Jedd Haas wrote:

I recommend cutting a cleanout slot or hole with removable plug, so you can brush out the swarf easily into a bin below the slot.
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First factor to consider is rigidity. you need a solid foundation for machine tools even the mini's.
Next thing to consider is the height of the machines. Build this to fit you.
Now utility. since you will be slopping coolant around from time to time the bench should be impervious to a soaking and provision should be made that it drain back and down into a bucket.
The bench should have drawers to hold tooling and fixtures.
Loaded, this bench will be heavy. Consider some way of attaching wheels so you can move it when you need to.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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Searcher7 wrote:

Check your local Sam's Club or equivalent big box store. They had a nice wood top work bench with steel tubing legs with adjustable height for user preference. Under $200, and large enough to accommodate both machines.
http://www.samsclub.com/shopping/navigate.do?catgS5&item29601&prDeTab=2#A
I can't build one this nice for that price.
Jim Vrzal Holiday, Fl.
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It hasn't been mentioned here in a while, but a great not-so-easy-to-find benchtop material is bowling lanes that are removed in sections when a bowling business is demolished or remodeled.
The lane sections will provide an excellent top for tables or benches, when mounted on a sturdy metal or wood frame.
WB metalworking projects http://www.kwagmire.com/metal_proj.html ...........

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Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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On Fri, 2 Feb 2007 10:31:22 -0500, "Wild Bill"

Most lanes are sold long before they are removed. Many go to Japan.
Gunner,

"Deep in her heart, every moslem woman yearns to show us her tits" John Griffin
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My first benches I made out of wood. But they soaked up oil, grease and other yucky fluids quickly and turned into eyesores.
Well one day I was at the junk store and ran across some excess chemistry lab modules. They were made of steel and topped with some sort of slate-like material. The top isn't slate but it is hard, non- porus and holds up well to hammering. AND it is easy to clean.
See if your local college or high school is remodeling one of the science labs and grab the top of one of the cabinets or better yet the whole thing.
I LOVE mine.
Gary
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On Feb 2, 2:28 pm, snipped-for-privacy@panamsat.com wrote:

Thanks everyone.
Ebay would probably be better than trying to locate attend and transport anything home from an industrial liquidation. That goes the same for finding "chemistry lab modules".
What about these option? http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item '0083643820
I'm assuming something more local to me than these would be better: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item 0080875340 http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item#0086374915
Also not local to me, here is some bowling lane flooring: http:// cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item%0080091637
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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Ok. I picked up the "Finley 2x4basics Workbench Assembly Kit #14090" and the "Finley 2x4basics Shelf Links, Black, 6-Pack # 09106" from Amazon.com.
Since bowling land flooring seems to be difficult to find, I'd apprecaite any other recommendations on the best wood to use for this project.
Thanks a lot.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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seems to be difficult to find, I'd

Maple hearts, (think $$$$$) would be best. Birch would be good also if you can't find maple. For softwood, southern yellow pine is pretty tough but make sure it's very dry, as it warps considerably as it dries out. Douglas fir is strong and stable but softer than SYP. where you're located will affect pricing. Local stuff is usually less costly. Tom
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wrote:

Thanks.
I guess hickory and oak are out. :-)
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
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Mr. El Cheapo Scrounger here, some time ago, I aquired a solid core, masonite faced door, which had been replaced by a steel faced unit. Damn near burned out my saw ripping it length wise into two bench tops, but with a bit of junk 2x4 framing and some recycled plywood, I came up with a pair of junk collecting surfaces that have stood me in good stead for the last 20+ years. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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wrote:

My parents dining room table, for over 40 yrs has been a large solid core door, with table legs bolted to it. Dad bought it in a "scratch & dent sale at the local lumber yard. Had a scratch in one face..now known as the Bottom Side.
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
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wrote:

South American Bubinga Wood, but only from trees on the NORTH side of the mountain.
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
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