Can I clean a bearing hub with WD 40

I always wonder if it is ok to clean a dirty bearing hub, like with WD 40 or
Kerosene. Will that screw up the lubrication for the bearings?
Reply to
pmaston
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WD-40 is a water displacer that leaves a gummy residue. Kerosene will float off lots of crud and leave a bit of lubrication. So the answer is "It depends". But WD40 is rarely a solution unless your problem is displacing water (or lubricating cutting tools for aluminum).
Reply to
Dave Hinz
Thanks for that information, what would you recommend for cleaning the bearing hub. Peter
Reply to
pmaston
I use it all the time on dirty bearings, but you'll have to re-lube them after cleaning.
Jim
Reply to
Jim Chandler
And in addition, do not spin the bearings with compressed air.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
... with a finger sticking in the bore? :-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I've heard that many times, what is the reasoning? 42
Reply to
42
If its a typical wheel bearing, that is an inner race, the rollers/ balls, and a cage, but no outer race, if you spin the bearing with air you can get the balls to fling out of the cage.
There was some speculation here awhile back that you could get a complete bearing with an outer race to fail as well (other than just damaging things from the lack of lube), don'y know if anyone nailed that one down.
Dave
Reply to
spamTHISbrp
On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 09:13:14 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, "42" quickly quoth:
If you spin it too fast and the outer land and cage can come off the balls, it can take fingers off. I still blow 'em off, but I don't spin 'em much any more.
-- Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life. -- Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
Reply to
Larry Jaques
This may be true; the other reason is that the fatigue life of rolling element bearing is quite sensitive to surface damage and with a completely unlubricated bearing spun fast this may occur; certainly if there is any grit around when it is spinning that will be enough to create fatigue initiation sites. Of course most ball bearings fail for other reasons than fatigue.
Reply to
newshound
To re post an item from several years back: One of the motorcycle race engines I used to race required main bearing changes after every race. As a result, I had a large surplus of slightly worn, approx. 1" diameter bearings. A fairly long road used to dead end onto another road that went in front of our house. Our driveway was on the other side of the road. I used to spin these bearings up with 175 psi air and release them to run down the road. The bearings would EASILY outrun cars driving at ordinary residential street speeds, spraying sparks all the while. When it hit a gravel or other debris, it would jump high into the air. Which resulted in some funny instances. Like when it chose to leap while under a car. Or when it hops up in front of a car. Driver reaction was interesting. I learned several things from this experience: * This is a lot of fun. * It is fairly hard to turn the bearing while is spinning due to gyroscopic effect. Turning the bearing can make it seize from the high side loading. * When the bearing seizes up while you're holding it, the friction heat makes a nasty burn on your fingers.
Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Can you help me visualize what you were doing? You held the bearing by the inner race, applied air kind of sideways, and then let go of the bearing?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus26128
I was re posting something from several years back, but yes, that would be how it was done. You can get them up to some impressive RPMs that way - enough to explode the outer race I'm told. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 20:18:04 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Gerald Miller quickly quoth:
You forgot to tell them to bend over it while they spin it, Gerry.
-- Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life. -- Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1811
Reply to
Larry Jaques
All the more reason not to do it Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller

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