Changing a tire at home

On Wed, 4 Feb 2009 20:50:16 -0800, "Calif Bill"


A spray bottle with soapy water plus a bit of glycerin works for me most of the time. A bit of extra air helps. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On Wed, 4 Feb 2009 05:37:06 -0800 (PST), stryped

It's not impossible, but a heck of a lot of work. You need to break the beads - I've done a lot of them with a slide hammer on the farm and doing "in the feild" equipment repair. I've done it with a jack under a beam or heavy vehicle. Have done it with a tractor loader, and by driving over them with a truch.
Then you need a pair of good tire irons to pry the bead off the rim, and to put it back on after inserting the tube.
Generally a WHOLE LOT smarter to just take them to a tire shop or general garage and have them done on the tire changer.
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stryped writes:

I tried the Harbor Freight $50 manual changer on 10-inch tires, and could not get this to work and felt it was impossible. Bead breaking was OK, but not getting the beads off the rims. It worked on my 8-inch lawn tractor tires but barely.
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I used to just put one of those Slime type sealants in for leaks like that. Never had a problem but probably pissed of the guy that had to change the tire. Karl
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Speaking of slime, would it be a good idea to add this to the tube before installing the tire? The tire "appears" in good shape although I dont know the age of the tire.
Also, I have been reading alot about "liquid tire balancers". I have also read that it is possible SLime would work the same way to "balance" the tire. Is this true?
The trailer is hardly ever used but it is frustrating when I have to go down in the field to get it and two tires are flat. I got a 4x4 stuck trying to pull it to the house during rainy weather to bring it to the house to air up the tires.
I already bought the tube but I wish I would have thoguth of the slime stuff. May have been easier.
I will say I have had good luck with tubes in trailer tires.
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On Thu, 5 Feb 2009 06:04:25 -0800 (PST), stryped

Not hard to find out. Look at the "dot" stamp on the tire. ALL highway tires MUST have a DOT number. It's the last 4 digits. Before 2000, it was a 3 digit code, with, say,121 being either the 12th week of 1971, 1981, or 1991. Since 2000 they have gone to a 4 digit code, so 5101 would be the second last week of 2001and 0108 would be the first week of 2008.

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On Thu, 5 Feb 2009 06:04:25 -0800 (PST), stryped

I bought a tube last summer for a yard trailer that had a "Slime" goo already added, so I guess you could add it in advance. Half of one, six dozen of the other...
Back in the 80s, I used some liquid balancing goo in my Panhead, and it worked very well indeed. It also (allegedly) worked to stop leaks, like Slime. However, each spring, after sitting all winter long, the wheels would be out of balance, and it required a few minutes driving at highway speeds to restore the balance (similar to the procedure after I first added the stuff). I haven't seen any for sale recently, though. I've not heard that Slime will do that, but it's possible.
Joe
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A lot of the old "liquid ballancer" solutions were full of asbestos fibre - so THOSE will be off the market.
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Well, not speaking of slime but that fix-a-flat stuff in a can will definitely piss them off if you don't tell them about it.
Wes
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I was having trouble breaking the bead on my truck tire once. I ended up using the front end loader on my backhoe. Don't have a backhoe? I'll sell you my Case 580B Diesel for only $6,900 obo, you can save a lot on changing tires :-)
RogerN

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