clausing colchester clutch adjustment

Hi, I recently got a used Clausing Colchester 17" lathe (1978) in
pretty good shape. I'm having 2 problems with it. First the clutch
slips excessively during engagement at high spindle speeds. Second,
the clutch lever tends to fall down to neutral, i.e. it does not stay
engaged sometimes.
Does anyone have experience with adjustments for these problems?
Thanks.
Reply to
dcs2005
Loading thread data ...
Those clutches are a real PITA--and can be very expensive from the factory, altho if you hunt around you can get replacement plates pretty cheap. I think Grand Machinery Exchange in NYC might have a lead.
In my nightmare a few years ago, there is a chromed knurled wheel at one end of the set plates that you turn to adjust the clutch tension, if it isn't already maxed out. You access it from the back, IIRC, by removing a small plate. We were minimally successful, and sold the lathe as it was.
I've heard that some people just run a hardened pin thru the whole clutch assembly, and finagle the operation, I would imagine, by having the motor come to a complete stop after each operation.
This is why some prefer the C-C roundheads. But the squares have all those pretty colors on the front plate!
The falling handle has gotta be a weak spring/detent. Follow the linkage. ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
The clutch adjustment instructions are normally printed on the panel which covers clutches on the back of the headstock. If they aren't there, I can send you a scan which keeps it simple, as there are two different clutch types.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
I sent this a cupla days ago, but didn't see it in the rcm ng.
Those clutches are a real PITA--and can be very expensive from the factory, altho if you hunt around you can get replacement plates pretty cheap. I think Grand Machinery Exchange in NYC might have a lead.
In my nightmare a few years ago, there is a chromed knurled wheel at one end of the set plates that you turn to adjust the clutch tension, if it isn't already maxed out. You access it from the back, IIRC, by removing a small plate. We were minimally successful, and sold the lathe as it was.
I've heard that some people just run a hardened pin thru the whole clutch assembly, and finagle the operation, I would imagine, by having the motor come to a complete stop after each operation.
This is why some prefer the C-C roundheads. But the squares have all those pretty colors on the front plate!
The falling handle has gotta be a weak spring/detent. Follow the linkage. ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
Hi,
I have exactly the same problems with my "new" Colchester Master 2500... I'll be having a look at it this weekend hopefully - I'll let you know how I get on...
Cheers,
Jez.
Reply to
Jez
I got mine squared away.. there is a shaft running through the apron with a key slot cut into it. The clutch lever turns this shaft for fwd/rev engagement. There is a sleeve with a key that fits over the shaft. The key & slot is worn just enough that I am not getting enough throw out of it. I can use the short clutch lever under the chuck & it all works great. Clausing wants $460.00 !!!!!!! for the little sleeve with the key inside it. Guess its time to make one....
I looked at the clutch plates & their ajdustment - no problems there all in great shape...
Reply to
dcs2005
please Mr Tom send it o me I need it
Reply to
jere
I disassembled the crossfeed screw on my causing Colchester 17 inch 1980 metal lathe. When l cleaned up the gin &reassembled it the indeed works bout the outfeed cuts off quickly. I can manually turn both ways with no problem. What did l change?
Reply to
rstarnes489
Hi, would you please send the procedure to me as well. Thanks
Reply to
Snegahdar
Hi, would you please send the procedure to me as well. Thanks
Reply to
Snegahdar

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.