Cleaning Brass

I just bought a torch and other brass attachments. Brass is tarnished and
dirty. What is the best method/products to use to clean them?
Thanks,
Steve
Reply to
Lucifer
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What color is the discoloration? Brown? Green? Something else?
Reply to
Dave Hinz
Some White, some Green and mostly a dark color all over. I just tried some Steel wool on it, seem to take most of it off. Also heard Brasso works wonders as well.
Thanks, Steve
Reply to
Lucifer
| Some White, some Green and mostly a dark color all over. | I just tried some Steel wool on it, seem to take most of it off. Also heard | Brasso works wonders as well. | | Thanks, | Steve
Brasso works wonders. My wife finally made me get rid of my million year old can of Duraglit. She doesn't know it, but I just put it somewhere else where she won't find it. Don't even know if it is available for most folks, I used gobs of it in the service.
Reply to
carl mciver
Lysol toilet bowl cleaner. I sh*t you not. Just wipe it on, rinse with water, and apply a protectant, because it will begin tarnishing immediately.
Reply to
Paul Calman
Brass wire brush!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Lysol toilet bowl cleaner. I sh*t you not. Just wipe it on, rinse with water, and apply a protectant, because it will begin tarnishing immediately.
My post from last nite doesnt show, sorry if it's redundant
Reply to
Paul Calman
First dip in 50/50 water - muratic acid solution for a short while or until the vigorous bubbling stops. IF you can't do that then get out the sand paper and work it down until you can go to various stages of steel wool and then brasso or take it to the nearest band instrument repair shop and have them buff it for you. It will look like gold when they are done.
regards, LB
Reply to
Leonard & Peggy Brown
Why clean them? You'll just get them all dirty again... and maybe not use it because of the work you put into getting it all nice and shiny! I'd just make sure the valves are working correctly and all the passages are clean and open. Plus, you stand the chance of damaging something by over-aggressive cleaning. my .02
Reply to
SPR
I hear that! Boy, you would *never* catch me putting my torch into muriatic acid .. how can you *guarantee* that you neutralize it afterward? I'd never be able to sleep worrying if that acid was still eating away at the inside of my torch.
If you have to make it pretty just get some Knorrostol and/or some Brasso and a bunch of old cotton towels, put on some good tunes, brew up a big cup of coffee, sit down and make it look pretty using the Armstrong torch polishing machine your mom gave you. - GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
tarnished and
I've proven to my satisfaction that cleaning off and polishing the welding tips keeps them from popping out while welding in close quarters where there's a lot of reflected heat. Might not make as much difference with cutting tips and attachments. Given the state of the torches and tips I see in the welding supply shop for repairs, you've got a lot of company in your thinking, some look like they've been dipped in asphalt. If they're polished to start with, not talking new ones here, they're a lot easier to keep clean afterwards. Usually just a wipe-down with a rag takes care of it. Maybe a little ultra-fine Scotchbrite if there's some slag on there. I haven't worn out a tip yet doing that. I used Brasso initially on my set of used tips and handle, took a couple of hours to clean them up. Something to do while watching the tube.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
I agree on putting the torch itself in Muratic acid but I wouldn't have any problems putting all brass items in the bath. On my instruments I usually use a 20 to 1 ratio: If I have the part in muratic (50%+50% water) then I leave it at least 20 minutes in water. I don't like dealing with acid but I sure don't want to deal with more chemicals to get it off. I have been doing this for 8 years now with no corrosion problems. I guess I would use chemicals to neutralize if I was in a hurry... but I ain't. The problem with Brasso is that it cleans up brass real good but doesn't do much to other gook that is on top of the brass, other than oxidation.
LB
Reply to
Leonard & Peggy Brown
Never-Dull, available at most supermarkets and home stores will shine your torch better than new!!
Good Luck
brad
Reply to
brad
If steel wool mostly gets it done, you're in good shape. Brasso left on for a while can do wonders. Other good preparations are Flitz, Simichrome, Mother's Metal Polish, and a host of others. Look at autoparts stores. If no luck locally, Flitz and/or Simichrome are available from
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Reply to
Don Foreman
Greetings and salutations....
If you have to have them shiny (and they won't last long that way anyway), I would suggest a buffing wheel and some brass polish. Don't dip it in any thing, don't soak it, and, don't sweat the black in the crevices. After all, this is a tool...not a piece of art. Regards Dave Mundt
Reply to
Dave Mundt

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