Cutting fluids for brass?

I know everyone says to not use any but-
I'm spending alot of time with a die filer and looking for any thing
that speeds up the job. The files don't cut as well as I expect
especially compared to when I am working with steel. The steel for
some reason is cutting faster than the brass. I'm also working with
'german silver" which is brass with some led in it and it also couts
easier than the brass. I've heard milk is sometimes used on copper if
this has anything to do with it. Haven't tried the milk yet.
Reply to
ken
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Are the files getting clogged with the brass? Rather than coolant I might try some wax lube in the files first. Do you have a air blow that could be set to keep the files clean as well?
ken wrote:
Reply to
Machineman
They say use *new* files on brass. Don't know why. I don't know of any cutting fluid especially good on brass. I too have heard of using condensed milk on copper.
Grant
ken wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Cutting copper requires extremely sharp tools. After a file has been used on steel it isn't as sharp as when it was new. It may still be able to provide many hours of use on steel, but it is too dull to properly be used on copper.
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
I will try as suggested the wax idea, and milk and anything else I can get my hands on. As for "new files" the boss would have to buy then and that isn't going to happen anytime soon. I think some of you can relate to this.
Reply to
ken
Milk is sometimes used for turning copper, not for filing. You use ordinary chalk to keep files from pinning. German silver is a nickle/copper alloy, no lead in it that I know of, some of it's pretty tough stuff. I've used it for knife butts and guards, it's best worked with a belt grinder.
Steel will dull a file enough that it doesn't work as well on copper and brass alloys as a new one will. It'll still cut, just not as well as one that's never touched steel. One way to keep files separated for different materials is to use different colors of chalk, white for steel and blue for brass, for example.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
Milk is sometimes used for turning copper, not for filing. You use ordinary chalk to keep files from pinning. German silver is a nickle/copper alloy, no lead in it that I know of, some of it's pretty tough stuff. I've used it for knife butts and guards, it's best worked with a belt grinder.
Steel will dull a file enough that it doesn't work as well on copper and brass alloys as a new one will. It'll still cut, just not as well as one that's never touched steel. One way to keep files separated for different materials is to use different colors of chalk, white for steel and blue for brass, for example.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
Cutting fluids are not needed, but the files must be kept clean and if you do much of it keep a set of files to be used only on brass. The chalk is needed.
Herb
Reply to
Herb

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