Conex Boxes on Cargo Ship in Ocean Storm

Not really metal working in the video, but products of metal working in the form of stacked Conex boxes and the ship hull undergoing some
severe strain testing in rough seas.
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i 1_1320213221
In conditions like that, you'd better hope some of those boxes don't let loose and unbalance the load.
I am not completely familiar with how these boxes lock together when stacked on the ship.
Do they just stack them up like Legos, where the bottom box locks to the deck and the next box locks to the top of the lower box and so forth? So, the strength of the entire stack is dependent on the strength of the lock down of the lowermost box?
If so, the strain on the lowermost box in seas like this must be incredible. Dave Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@is.invalid used his keyboard to write :

Have look at this site. The Rena has been aground for about a month now off New Zealand. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid 763217
These are full size Sea containers 40 feet long and 8 feet wide about, not the weenie Conex containers you may have encountered in Military sevice.
--
John G.



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That is a tough go condition.
I wonder if a crane tower could be attached to the high side hull and the boom have a lifting bar attached to the stack on the far side.
The tower could winch up the boxes and slide weights outward on the tower that is now becoming parallel to the water - starting out 45 degrees.
Just a thought - and I'd hate to pay the overtime, hazard time and insurance on the crane - but then the boxes might pay for that in a handshake.
Martin
On 11/2/2011 3:59 AM, John G wrote:

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Martin Eastburn laid this down on his screen :

The Govmint and the Conservation movement are very concerned about the pollution of a National Park ( just a description) type beach.
Some people who left Christchurch after the earthquake have their lifetimes possesions in containers out there on that boat.
--
John G.



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wrote:

I guess I thought Conex was just a generic term for that type of container and didn't realize a Sea container and a Conex box were two different items. Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@is.invalid wrote:

This is how they are locked together. http://www.tandemloc.com/0_securing/S_AD54000A.asp
The lock on the hull is similar but works from the side. Plus they usually lock every other row together with a device that looks like a bar clamp with hooh pade.
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

Great new information to me. I always wondered about how this was accomplished but never really investigated it. The forces on those components must become massive in rolling seas like those in the video. Any defect in their manufacture could lead to serious problems at sea. Dave
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On Nov 3, 12:47am, snipped-for-privacy@is.invalid wrote:

The key to making container ships viable was the locking system, invented in the 1960s. The inventor of that system just recently died.
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