Cutting board to fit kitchen sink

My latest domestic kitchen-support project was to take a very stiff 12"x18" high-density polyethylene (HDPE) cutting board, and trim it down
to 17.5", so it fits snugly over the stainless-steel kitchen sink, allowing my wife to cut messy foods over the sink (and disposal).
Trimming the cutting board was easy with bandsaw and an ordinary woodworking plane. The machining part of this project took maybe 30 minutes, mostly due to trimming and rounding edges with the woodworking plane so the board rested snugly and securely on the edges of the sink.
For the record, ordinary (low density) polypropylene is a bit too flexible, even if 0.5" thick. (The board cannot be thicker than this and still fit in the dishwasher.) I was looking for 0.5" polypropylene, which is offered by such web merchants as chefscatalog.com (Item # 24406), but The Container Store claimed to have such a thing, and they are local, so I went there. It turned out to be 3/8" thick and made of HDPE, not polypropylene, but seemed stiff enough, and cost only $17 or so. The Chef's Catalog description is "high-density polypropylene", which does not exist, so I bet it's HDPE as well.
If this modified 3/8" HDPE board doesn't work out, I'll buy some 0.5" polypropylene stock and make a cutting board to fit the sink; this was the original plan.
Joe Gwinn
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I think I paid Port Plastics about $20.00 a year or so ago for a 3/4 x 18 x 24 piece of uhmw
--Mostly I use it to divide beef primal sections into smaller roasts, steaks etc....Generally I just wash it by hand although it will fit diagonally upright in the Hobart undercounter sanitizer unit if I use a peg style plate rack.
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For my Bosch dishwasher, 18" by 12" by 0.5" fits nicely along one side, leaving the rest of the space for dishes.
I did try to use a piece of 3/8" UHMW polyethylene as a cutting board, but right from the start it would not lay flat on the counter, so it was withdrawn from the kitchen, and now serves to keep my 4-jaw lathe chuck up off the concrete floor.
Joe Gwinn
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The trouble with plastic cutting boards is that they look like crap in short order and the wounds in the plastic harbor nasty critters. Consider laminating some hard Maple strips then machine. It will look good and last forever.
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Tom Gardner wrote:

The dishwasher does a decent job of keeping the critters out of the gouges. The real restaurant supply places sell thick 3/4"+ plastic cutting boards that are intended to be belt sanded now and then when they get gouged up. Personally I use a bunch or the thin flexible plastic cutting boards and like the ability to flex them into a chute when depositing the items I chopped on them into a pan or bowl.
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Pete C. wrote:
(...)

Every couple years, I go to my plastic monger and buy several sheets of thin HDPE in various colors. I slice them up into disposable cutting boards and store them in the kitch.
Just like you, I discovered that I could easily form the surface into a funnel and dispense sliced whatever on to a pan or pot.
Rinse it off in hot water and flip it over when one side gets too ugly.
Toss it when both sides are no longer pretty. Cheap, convenient and easy.
--Winston
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Every so often I lay towel that's been wetted with soapy water and clorox onto it for about 10 minutes.
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PrecisionmachinisT wrote:
(...)

I stumbled across this just now from: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/woodvsplascu.html
"A good procedure for disinfecting both wood and plastic cutting boards, as well as other surfaces and utensils, is to spray them first with a mist of vinegar, then with a mist of hydrogen peroxide."
I don't know what the vinegar is supposed to do, but I am a real evangelist for the power of H2O2, especially the "40 volume" (12%) liquid (non cream) stuff. That *smokes* microbes RFN.
http://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.com/hairdressing-peroxide.html
--Winston
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That's all the MORE reason to "get exposed" to minor amounts of infectants.
When I went to RVN, I was a "country boy". NOBODY would eat anything the locals serve, for fear of getting the runs.
I ate everything I could buy, and suffered greatly for about a month. After that, I could eat off the local economy any time I wanted, without penalty.
Gotta build up the "gut bugs". It's actually MORE healthy than surviving in a sterile environment.
Hell... I even (still) keep (and use) a bottle of Nuc Mam in the pantry. It's good, if you can get past the smell! <G>
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

It's all fun and games until you come down with a case of misdiagnosed MSRA: http://deadlydeceit.com/necrotizingf.html

Who said anything about 'sterile'? :)
--Winston <--Did the dinosaurs have a '30 hour rule'?
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wrote:

Stay away from hospitals, doctor's offices, and biological warfare labs. They're the only places where you catch the real nasties.

You looked as if you were going to any second there, Winnie. Any second.

I think it was a 30 second rule. We're quicker so ours is 3.
-- If we attend continually and promptly to the little that we can do, we shall ere long be surprised to find how little remains that we cannot do. -- Samuel Butler
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Not according to the news. MSRA is being spread by infected emplyees at food processing plants.
--
You can't fix stupid. You can't even put a Band-Aid on it, because it's
Teflon coated.
  Click to see the full signature.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Thank you for your service to our country, Lloyd.

Notny more. The article mentions that the new resistant super bugs were extremely rare in the 1990s. Many have now attained 'epidemic' status, propagating in improperly treated trash and sewage as well as unsafe composting practices.
This ain't our grandfather's strep and staph.

Pshaw, I say. Moderation, not psychosis.
Our job is to maintain our existing feedback loops in shape and give them medical assistance when they fall out of regulation. I *agree* that the occasional 'bacterial challenge' is normally a *good thing*. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccine
However: Part of our task is to avoid (let's face it) serious man-made illnesses that are likely to knock our feedback loops flat before they have time to recover.
Our problems start the moment we deny the massive effectiveness of our evolved hardware and our problems get really huge when we hand over total responsibility for our wellness to elite shamans, some of which would not recognise the Hippocratic Oath if it were spelled out in front of them. They are part of our exploding criminal class because they make their money *creating* illness.
--Winston
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Winston wrote:
(...)

> they make their money *creating* illness.
Ed, I'm not lumping you and your new Spa in with Harley, Gary and Ali here. Your plan is to have participants *recover* from illness, AFAIK :)
--Winston
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My plan is individually therapeutic and socially beneficial. And, if you spend some time cleaning up my garage, I'll reduce the price.
--
Ed Huntress



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Ed Huntress wrote:

Price?
I thought you were *offering* participants 50 smackers.
I'm not nearly as excited, now. :)
--Winston
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The cost of medical care is just going up all over, Winston.

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Ed Huntress wrote:

:)
--Winston
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wrote:

Right.
Ayup. It's all about money any more. Doctors make a whole lot more maintaining an illness vs. removing it from their patients. Can you say "Medical/Industrial Complex"? I knew you could.
When I'm king, there will be free/cheap clinics everywhere again, and they'll allow us white folk in 'em again.
-- If we attend continually and promptly to the little that we can do, we shall ere long be surprised to find how little remains that we cannot do. -- Samuel Butler
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On Thu, 12 May 2011 18:59:57 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Indeed. Same here. Though I still dont much like nuc mam.
Gunner
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