Ceramic kitchen knives

I would like to try buying a ceramic kitchen knife like this
ebay 310099844249
just mostly out of curiosity. Has anyone tried them. Thanks

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On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 20:22:21 -0600, Ignoramus6517

Always Sharp Guarantee:
To sharpen simply mail your Tachi knife back to the distributor with 9.95 for return shipping.
I wonder how often they need sharpening?
jeff
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Very seldom, if taken care of. A ceramic knife can be scary scary sharp, and stay that way a long time.
Just dont drop one on a concrete floor, or even a granite countertop.
Gunner
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Ignoramus6517 wrote:

Haven't tried them personally. They're supposed to be very sharp and stay sharp, but they are of course relatively brittle, so unlike a conventional steel knife you can break it fairly easily. I believe the infamous Harbor Freight carries one or two models.
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Everything that is from HF and has sharp edges, does not stay sharp for long. I like their stuff that is welded, forged, but not sharp edged or motor powered.
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I have the HF 5" model, it is tough & sharp and doesn't stain or rust. It seems sharper than steel, and easily cuts the tough plastic bubble packages better than anything else i've tried. IIRC it is non-metallic and missed by metal detectors and I believe it is considered 'plastic' by TSA ;)
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wrote:

IIRC it is non-metallic

Actually, I just saw these made on the "How it's Made" TV show. For security concerns, they mix a small amount of metal powder in the knife so it Does set off the metal detectors.
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Is that true for knives made in China?
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this sounds dubious.
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wrote:

It does, especially since the usual reason for adding metal powder to ceramics is to (1) allow lower-temperature sintering, and thus to lower cost; or (2) to increase toughness. That's what cermet cutting inserts are all about.
It wouldn't surprise me if they were using cermet technology in knives for the same reason. It *would* surprise me if they were doing it for metal detection.
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I've only played with the first generation of Kyocera kitchen knives from over 10 years ago. I'm pretty sure they were 100% alumina.
They are very sharp and just beg to be broken or chipped. The novelty factor aside, it's not really clear to me what they offer over a good carbon steel knife, which nobody seems to sell anymore.
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Some of the ceramic knife companies put a chunk of metal in the handle for detection purposes. Karl
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I bought a 5" version from Harbor Freight and love it. Very sharp, does not stain. AFAIK does not respond to a metal detector, I think it is considered a plastic knife by TSA ;)
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Ignoramus6517 wrote:

Without looking on fleabay I can say I have a nice set Kyocera Classic Ceramics.
They works VERY well for routine kitchen work. the edge is sharper than most of my steel blades and holds it a long time. They don't stain when used to cut acidic foods, and they slice straight due to the low friction of the ceramic. It is possible to sharpen them if you dull the edge HOWEVER I would suggest sending them back to the company as the edge requires more than just a diamond stone to sharpen it properly.
Drawbacks, the blades CAN be fragile, it depends on who actually made them and how they finished them. You also want a GOOD wood or plastic cutting board, just like the ones you want for steel blades. That keeps the edge from being damaged and worn. NO HAMMERING ON THE BACKSTRAP!!!
The top names in ceramics are Kyocera, Tachi, Shenzhen (who also make ceramic blades for a couple of the HIGH end steel blade companies)
http://www.kyoceraadvancedceramics.com / http://www.tachiblades.com / http://www.shenzhenknives.com /
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 20:22:21 -0600, the infamous Ignoramus6517

I bought a 6" chef's knife about 4 years ago and used it happily for about a year, when I broke it. I was cutting down through a head of cabbage when it got through the dense core and started speeding down at the cutting board. As it hit, it shattered at the junction of the handle, breaking into two pieces. Up until then, I had adored the thing. While it was just as sharp at the end of the year as it was new, it is said that they can be honed on diamond plates.
I remain a strong proponent of ceramic knives.
Ig, I have two caveats for you:
1) Shock is your enemy. Don't allow it to hit the cutting board very hard or fast.
2) The cutting edge is brittle. Don't try to cut bone or attempt to cut frozen items. And resist rotating the knife in the cut, but rocking is OK. (I learned anti-rotation with a tiny 1/16" chip, but the chipped edge is just as sharp, so it didn't diminish the cutting capacity. (google "flintknapping")
Other than that, they're really great knives. Go for it! The top brands cost about triple that price.
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wrote:

Are these similar to the glass knives that were peddled in the 1940's and 1950's? They had the same keen cutting edge and shattering problem. Mom wouldn't buy one because they just didn't seem safe.
Paul
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On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 09:06:51 -0800 (PST), the infamous

No, I strongly doubt it. These are metallic ceramic called "zirconia", aka "man-made diamond", which I believe hadn't been invented back then.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_knives Tempered glass. Not the same at all, Paul.
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scrawled the following:

Zirconia (zirconium dioxide) is not man-made diamond. It's just another ceramic. Man-made diamond is...man-made diamond. <g>
Zirconia is the material used to make Mitutoyo's Cerablock gage blocks.

I see you read those links about Latin. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
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On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 23:00:23 -0500, the infamous "Ed Huntress"

And Cubic Zirconia is the trade name of one manmade diamond.

Yeah, for kicks. I have a Latin book you might enjoy hearing about. _How to Insult, Abuse, and Insinuate in Classical Latin_. ;)
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wrote in message

Uh, not that I know of. It's the name of an *artificial* diamond. It isn't diamond, manmade or otherwise. It isn't even carbon.

My son probably would enjoy that. <g>
-- Ed Huntress
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