melt ABS pellets on kitchen stove ?

I saw an ad on eBay for "Green Cycolac ABS Resin" pellets. Is this =
something that could be melted on a kitchen stove and poured into a mold =
? Any comments on this sort of thing are welcome!
Thanks !
JCD
Reply to
Pogo
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--Not sure about this stuff, but it's safer to use a double boiler with some of the lower temperature plastics, so you don't risk starting a fire..
Reply to
steamer
I thought about this but ABS has a melting point of right about 212F. The inside of the double-boiler would never exceed that temperature, and would probably be less. So, the material would be in a loose plastic state, but probably not flow.
ABS is an extraordinarily smelly plastic when melting and burning, and it's never a good idea to melt any plastics in the kitchen except the ones specically for craft applications because the gasses can get into open food containers, etc.
-- Gordon
Reply to
Gordon McComb
that could be melted on a kitchen stove and poured into a mold ? Any comments on this sort of thing are welcome!
Have you seen Polymorph aka Shapelock?
As described on
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"This is a plastic which melts at around 60 degrees C / 140 degrees F so that you can melt it in hot water and mash it about with your hands. It sets again when it cools and is probably as tough as nylon."
regards, Colin
Reply to
Colin Durrans
something that could be melted on a kitchen stove and poured into a mold = ? Any comments on this sort of thing are welcome!
Good suggestion but I have already tried their sample a while back. I = need something that will flow into a mold and this stuff - as far as I = can tell - needs to be mashed around with your fingers, as you = mentioned.=20
Good suggestion, though ! Thanks !
Reply to
Pogo
Phew! Thanks for the warning about the gases. Good to know! JCD
Reply to
Pogo
That's good info on the double boiler.
Of course I found out more on the net after posting this. I'm thinking = that using a solvent is the way to go with stuff. Acetone maybe. And = from Gordon's post, definitely do it outside! As I discover more I will = post if here for others to benefit from.
Thanks ! JCD
Reply to
Pogo
that could be melted on a kitchen stove and poured into a mold ? Any comments on this sort of thing are welcome!
ABS is an amorphous plastic. What this means to you is that it won't ever get very liquid-- it doesn't really have a melting point-- so a lot of pressure is required to get it to conform to a mold.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
something that will flow into a mold and this stuff - as far as I can tell - needs to be mashed around with your fingers, as you mentioned.
can you inject your mold with a large syringe?
regards, colin
Reply to
Colin Durrans
I need something that will flow into a mold and this stuff - as far as I = can tell - needs to be mashed around with your fingers, as you = mentioned.=20
Yeah I could do that. You thinking about using the Shapelok stuff in a = syringe ? I don't know ... seems very viscous for that. Maybe one of = those big metal ones like used in zoos and stuff ?
Reply to
Pogo
--Plan B: there used to be a couple of companies that manufactured small injection molding machines. IIRC one could be chucked in a drillpress; very simple design. The two companies that spring to mind are Minijector and Simplomatic. Time marches on and Minijector's smallest unit is this one:
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--Simplomatic had quite an array of machines but they're very brick-and-mortar: they don't have a page up yet...
Reply to
steamer
Plan C: Used fused deposition modelling; one of the plastics that can be exploited is ABS. Just a few weeks ago this topic came up, and Dean Schrickel provided a very interesting Web site for a home-made machine in the $400 range: reprap.org. FDM is cheaper than injection molding, easier (no need to construct molds), and safer. The RepRap uses polycaprolactone (polymorph), which has a lower melting point than ABS, and would be the material of choice for a low-end machine. Melting ABS can cause very serious third-degree burns, and I personally wouldn't handle it without some good training.
There's also this Wiki page folks should look at:
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As a point of reference, the white plastic polycaprolactone connectors used to construct the RepRap frame are themselves "printed" using FDM. The metal rods, stepper motors, and other metal parts are purchased; the page includes construction details and parts list.
-- Gordon
Reply to
Gordon McComb
Minijector and
Cool! Didn't know such an item even existed! Thanks - JCD
Reply to
Pogo
Dear Pogo,
Recently I started using a two part casting plastic called InstaCast. The supplier is Douglas and Sturgess. Product is CR-1014W. I got it in SF but you can order online at
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It pours like a heavy cream, picks up fine detail, and you can add stuff like glass fiber to it to change it's chars. I think it would be easier and less smelly than boiling ABS.
Brad Smallridge AiVision
Reply to
Brad Smallridge
Man those are good prices on that stuff ! Thanks for the tip! JCD
Reply to
Pogo
You don't say what the intended use is, but you can probably melt hot glue sticks on the stove top. You might need a double boiler with cooking oil in it instead of water to get the higher temperatures.
Reply to
Si Ballenger

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