melt ABS pellets on kitchen stove ?

I saw an ad on eBay for "Green Cycolac ABS Resin" pellets. Is this something that could be melted on a kitchen stove and poured into a mold ? Any comments on this sort of thing are welcome!
Thanks ! JCD
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    --Not sure about this stuff, but it's safer to use a double boiler with some of the lower temperature plastics, so you don't risk starting a fire..
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steamer wrote:

I thought about this but ABS has a melting point of right about 212F. The inside of the double-boiler would never exceed that temperature, and would probably be less. So, the material would be in a loose plastic state, but probably not flow.
ABS is an extraordinarily smelly plastic when melting and burning, and it's never a good idea to melt any plastics in the kitchen except the ones specically for craft applications because the gasses can get into open food containers, etc.
-- Gordon
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Phew! Thanks for the warning about the gases. Good to know! JCD
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That's good info on the double boiler.
Of course I found out more on the net after posting this. I'm thinking that using a solvent is the way to go with stuff. Acetone maybe. And from Gordon's post, definitely do it outside! As I discover more I will post if here for others to benefit from.
Thanks ! JCD
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Pogo wrote:

that could be melted on a kitchen stove and poured into a mold ? Any comments on this sort of thing are welcome!
Have you seen Polymorph aka Shapelock?
As described on http://www.xrobots.co.uk/ "This is a plastic which melts at around 60 degrees C / 140 degrees F so that you can melt it in hot water and mash it about with your hands. It sets again when it cools and is probably as tough as nylon."
regards, Colin
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Good suggestion but I have already tried their sample a while back. I need something that will flow into a mold and this stuff - as far as I can tell - needs to be mashed around with your fingers, as you mentioned.
Good suggestion, though ! Thanks !
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Pogo wrote:

something that will flow into a mold and this stuff - as far as I can tell - needs to be mashed around with your fingers, as you mentioned.
can you inject your mold with a large syringe?
regards, colin
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Yeah I could do that. You thinking about using the Shapelok stuff in a syringe ? I don't know ... seems very viscous for that. Maybe one of those big metal ones like used in zoos and stuff ?
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    --Plan B: there used to be a couple of companies that manufactured small injection molding machines. IIRC one could be chucked in a drillpress; very simple design. The two companies that spring to mind are Minijector and Simplomatic. Time marches on and Minijector's smallest unit is this one: http://www.minijector.com/model45.php     --Simplomatic had quite an array of machines but they're very brick-and-mortar: they don't have a page up yet...
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steamer wrote:

Plan C: Used fused deposition modelling; one of the plastics that can be exploited is ABS. Just a few weeks ago this topic came up, and Dean Schrickel provided a very interesting Web site for a home-made machine in the $400 range: reprap.org. FDM is cheaper than injection molding, easier (no need to construct molds), and safer. The RepRap uses polycaprolactone (polymorph), which has a lower melting point than ABS, and would be the material of choice for a low-end machine. Melting ABS can cause very serious third-degree burns, and I personally wouldn't handle it without some good training.
There's also this Wiki page folks should look at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RepRap
As a point of reference, the white plastic polycaprolactone connectors used to construct the RepRap frame are themselves "printed" using FDM. The metal rods, stepper motors, and other metal parts are purchased; the page includes construction details and parts list.
-- Gordon
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Cool! Didn't know such an item even existed! Thanks - JCD
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On Sat, 2 Jun 2007 15:03:35 -0400, the renowned "Pogo"
that could be melted on a kitchen stove and poured into a mold ? Any comments on this sort of thing are welcome!

ABS is an amorphous plastic. What this means to you is that it won't ever get very liquid-- it doesn't really have a melting point-- so a lot of pressure is required to get it to conform to a mold.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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Dear Pogo,
Recently I started using a two part casting plastic called InstaCast. The supplier is Douglas and Sturgess. Product is CR-1014W. I got it in SF but you can order online at www.artstuf.com
It pours like a heavy cream, picks up fine detail, and you can add stuff like glass fiber to it to change it's chars. I think it would be easier and less smelly than boiling ABS.
Brad Smallridge AiVision
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Man those are good prices on that stuff ! Thanks for the tip! JCD
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On Sat, 2 Jun 2007 15:03:35 -0400, "Pogo"

You don't say what the intended use is, but you can probably melt hot glue sticks on the stove top. You might need a double boiler with cooking oil in it instead of water to get the higher temperatures.
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