Information on kit bashing: cutting tools

I am thinking about kit bashing and making a unique structure from them. My question has to do with cutting prepressed parts for resizing purposes. What
tools and procedures work the best. TIA
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serveyerself wrote:

Well it depends on what you are working on. Metal, wood, Styrene? What are you "kit bashing" ? Mike M
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plastic

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X-acto knife , razor saw and some small files comes to my mind.
Greetz Jan
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Jan ( Bouli ) Van Gerwen wrote:

Use a straight edge and several light cuts. Test fit and dress with a file to make a snug joint. Use liquid plastic cement applied with a small brush. Consider where and how you will apply interior bracing to strengthen joints.
And oh yes: measure, and measure again (and again) before cutting.
A good trick is to photocopy the parts, and cut apart the photocopies to test different combinations.
cheers, wolf k.
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Plastic is cast in high pressure molds to the shape and size desired. Moderately high temps are also used in the molding process. Table top describes "engineeriing type" mold making machine and these weigh hundreds of pounds to begin with. Work with plastics with typical woodworking tools and things will be fine.
-- Bob May
rmay at nethere.com http: slash /nav.to slash bobmay http: slash /bobmay dot astronomy.net
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On 2/7/2010 7:40 AM serveyerself spake thus:

Others have given some good answers. I'll just give you my general take on what tools you need.
You can do most (or all) of what you want to do with ordinary tools, some of which you probably already have:
o small saws ("razor" saws, like Xacto or equivalent) o hobby knife (Xacto or equiv.) o small drills (might want to get a set of small number drills, #61 to 80, available at many hardware stores)
For heavier cuts, I find an ordinary utility knife is better than a little #11 Xacto. And you'll need a good straightedge, preferably metal, not plastic so you don't slice into it. Styrene (which 99% of the plastic you'll be dealing with is) can be scored and then cut by snapping or bending; you don't always have to cut all the way through.
A model railroad scale ruler (available at many places: General makes a good one) is nice for measuring in "pretend" (i.e., HO) feet.
A good cutting board helps. I make my own from sheets of Masonite (hardboard or equivalent), to which I glue thick-ish sheets of posterboard or illustration board. When the surface gets too sliced up, I glue a new sheet of paper to it.
A roll of masking tape or similar will help hold things together temporarily.
When you get to painting, a set of small paint brushes is needed. You can start with a cheap set you can get at the dollar store. Good brushes (more expen$ive) are available at any good art store. Lots of other goodies at the art store too.
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David Nebenzahl wrote: [...]

I use one of those self-healing cutting pads used by quilters. Excellent value IMO.
[...]
cheers, wolf
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I also use those self-healing cutting pads: I call them "my hands".
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Twibil wrote:

LOL
wolf k.
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Yep use those too, I especially like the ease of squaring up things along the grid lines on these pads. I got a whole box of these ( 20 ) at a local euro store when they were only 1,50 each for the somewhat larger then A4 size.
Greetz Jan my model train site www.janbouli.com
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Why Newton, Kansas?
The Fox Theater front looks very good. Did you have to scratch build the doors?
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wrote:

Newton was 'the' railroad hub for the Santa Fe and maybe other RR in the 40's, 50's & 60's. It was centrally located.
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A few reasons actually, first of all i wanted a town where the Santa Fe SuperChief ran through, then a region where at least 2 other Railroads were running and interchanging ( Mopac and Rock Island ), I also didn't want to do the usual suspects ( Tecohapi, Cajon Pass etc. ) , I do want to scratchbuild the beautiful station of Newton, I'm not into rocky mountain scenes, I love smalltowns with the typical mainstreet buildings ( plenty of those in Kansas ). All these things made me do research on Newton and Kansas in general. I've obtained quite a few books on the subject and reading these books, getting a copy of Kansas ( the magazine ) every few months, in short getting to know Kansas has made me even more confident of my choice to model this region. Of course from Europe its hard to tell but I get the feeling that this is a part of the US that is still the US as most europeans think of it, it's certainly a place where I could imagine myself living if I had a decent job.
So those are my reasons, imho nice , good reasons to base my dream layout on, don't you think.
Oh and confirming that my choice was good, was the fact that I've already had lots of help from Kansas people, Elisabeth Hurley telling me where I could get a copy of her fathers book, or Mrs Rachel Goossen who personally sent me a copy of her manuscript "Brick an Mortar a History of Newton Kansas", or the half dozen Kansan people that went out and took pictures of the depot and other buildings in Newton and mailed them to me, etc. etc. I've never been there ( I will though ) but I love Kansas ;-)

The doors are a piece of clear styreen with strips of silver painted styreen to resemble the doors, it was my first try at scratchbuilding and I'm still a far way from scratchbuilding the Newton Depot, my next project in Newton will be the Railroad Savings Bank the hard part about this are the ornaments because in N-scale they don't make things like that so I'll have to make them from clay or something myself.
In the last year I've also decided not to stay prototypical for the whole layout( the meatpacking plant I'm building right now doesnt exist in Harvey county but it could have ), but instead get some significant buildings in the right places so that people that look at my layout will say "hey thats Newton or at least Harvey county Kansas"
Greetz Jan
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Sounds like a lot of fun and if you do get to Kansas you will have a pre-existing fan club!
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snip

While at the art store or the 'craft' store (Michaels), stock up on acrylic paints at better than hobby paint prices. Way better!
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LDosser wrote:

Aren't those craft store paints rather thick compared to our typical MRR paints like Floquil? Don't want to cover up the tiny details.
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Rick Jones wrote:

[...]
Whyncha try 'em and see? ;-)
They are more than good enough for most painting jobs around the layout, esp. scenery and structures. They are excellent when thinned to be used as washes for weathering, tinting rock, toning down over-bright enamels, etc. Bonus: the flat ones are dead flat. Since most of them are water based acrylics, you do have to thoroughly wash plastic first, and prime everything (which you do anyway, right?)
cheers, wolf k.
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What Wolf said ...
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On 2/8/2010 9:06 AM Rick Jones spake thus:

>

>>

Nope. As I've said before, nothing magical about the paints you buy at the hobby store as opposed to the much cheaper ones you find at "craft" stores. It's not as if the pigments in the model railroad paints are ground for 1:87 rendition. Plus they come in a *lot* more colors. (Only problem is that you can't buy them in standard railroad colors like Pullman green or whatever, but for buildings, etc., they're great.)
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