Information on kit bashing: cutting tools

I am thinking about kit bashing and making a unique structure from them. My question has to do with cutting prepressed parts for resizing purposes. What
tools and proceedures work the best. TIA
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serveyerself wrote:

Not sure what you mean by "prepressed" parts. Can you define that?
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parts that make up the kit

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serveyerself wrote:

Ah, okay, the styrene parts. In addition to a #11 X-acto blade, I use a Zona razor saw- also X-acto makes a razor saw for their large handles and I use one of them too.
The latest tool on the bench is a smaller saw with a photo etched blade- makes a VERY fine kerf. A couple of mfgs of those now.
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Don Stauffer wrote:

You mean like this ??
http://www.nostalgicplastic.com/moreinfo.cfm?FROM tegory&KIT872
I've used this for years now, and it makes very fine cuts, and if your careful and use it without the handle as I do, can make curved cuts, tho you have to be careful from breaking the blade into small pieces. Even if you do, the small pieces work just fine too.
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Don Stauffer wrote the following:

Has anyone used this saw blade?
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Yes.
See my previous posting.
It works better than I ever thought it would. Matter of act, I use it almost exclusively to separate parts from the sprue's, as there is minimal cleanup required afterward.
Get one, you will not be sorry !
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willshak wrote the following:

It would help if I actually posted the link. :-) http://www.micromark.com/-11-SIZE-SAW-BLADES-015-X-24-TPI-PKG-OF-2,6570.html?sc=WGB&utm_source=GoogleBase&utm_medium ed&utm_campaign=GoogleBase or: http://tinyurl.com/y9x6v2o
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willshak wrote:

http://www.micromark.com/-11-SIZE-SAW-BLADES-015-X-24-TPI-PKG-OF-2,6570.html?sc=WGB&utm_source=GoogleBase&utm_medium ed&utm_campaign=GoogleBase

Hi.
Yes, I've used those, but they do not give as fine a cut as these;
http://www.nostalgicplastic.com/moreinfo.cfm?FROM tegory&KIT872
I've been using these for over ten years now, they are better than the one's in the link you posted.
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AM wrote the following:

I was thinking that since they tapered to a point, it might be easier to get into tight places or be able to make curved cuts. We'll see since I sent for the 7 piece set.
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willshak wrote:

Well... I accidentally broke a blade a while back, and use the smaller pieces to get into small places. The blades are VERY flexible, and as long as one is careful, curved cuts are a breeze to make. And the teeth on the fine side of the blade are soo fine, you literally need a magnifying glass to even see them.
I can't speak highly of them enough.
But since ya already ordered, have fun :)
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serveyerself wrote:

My main tool is an X-acto knife. This is a handle with a number of replaceable blades. Start by using the blade to "draw" the line you are cut by lightly pressing it onto the surface. Then follow with a series of deeper cuts. This process generally ruins one side of the cut, if you need both sides -say you're separating a hood of a car to show it open, or having an airplane wing hinge in half to store on an aircraft carrier- you may have to buy two copies of the model, one to cut the hood out of the body, and one to cut the body away from the hood.
--
-Jack


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As others have mentioned, razor saws and xacto blades are good tools.
Dremels and sandpaper are also very useful.
For example, you can thin the backside of a part with a dremel along the line you intend to scribe. Make the scribing job simpler since there's less material to cut through.
You'll need to be careful when removing material from the backside ... if you remove too much, you'll be buying another kit.
I have collected a box of "greeblies" over the years. Interesting tidbits that would otherwise end up in the garbage ... tooth paste caps, sprockets from electronic toys, heat sinks from old computer and electronic bits, lids to chocolate milk containers.
All are useful for scratchbuilding and adding to kitbashed projects.
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