deburring inside drilled tubing?

Perhaps one of the Cogsdill Deburr tools would provide an answer?
formatting link
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Loading thread data ...
What type of HP does the drilling machine have?
What type of clearance do you have at the end of the tube? Can you shift the tool 1" and have the last bit drill / deburr air or is there a clearance issue?
It may come down to the fact that you can do most of teh holes in a single shot and then have to either drill or clean up a hole or two by hand because you can't simply move the head to where it needs to be...
Of course, there is the option of a 30 spindle head that has 15 spindels across from another 15 spindles spaced at 2" so all you have to do is drill, stroke the table in the X or Y access across the holes to clear the tube and deburr... But we are talking about a serious drilling machine now. Not even sure an old Bridgepirt could handle the stresses involved. Might have to build a custom machine to do that. Maybe direct drive the head with a motor or two and build a manual slide aparatus?
Reply to
Joe
Wayne,
Another way of avoiding burr inside the tubing, is to punch the holes rather than drill them. You will need to make a shoe horn type die. I have seen them to give amazing results.
Rathin Sinha San Stampings Pvt. Ltd.
Reply to
rsinha
Wayne,
Another way of avoiding burr inside the tubing, is to punch the holes rather than drill them. You will need to make a shoe horn type die. I have seen them to give amazing results.
Rathin Sinha San Stampings Pvt. Ltd.
Reply to
rsinha
Wayne,
Another way of avoiding burr inside the tubing, is to punch the holes rather than drill them. You will need to make a shoe horn type die. I have seen them to give amazing results.
Rathin Sinha San Stampings Pvt. Ltd.
Reply to
Rathin Sinha
An Aushalser is known as a Tee drill in English. Clever (and expensive) device made in Finland and distributed just up the road out of Norcross GA.
formatting link
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
I've used the handheld deburring tools for years, and they're great for most tasks, but the internal edges of holes in tubing are a little too complex to allow them to be very effective. I can't help but wonder (about well, lots of things), if a spinning wire brush wouldn't clean up the holes nicely. Check with Tom at Ohio Brush for the availability of different bristle materials and sizes. This would be relatively severe duty for the longevity of the brush, so cheap imported retail store brushes wouldn't provide good results. This would be a second operation, but a brush (those spiraled tube brushes) mounted in a spinning drill press chuck and poked into the drilled holes, would probably do a good job of deburring, and possibly add a small radius to the edges of the holes in aluminum tubing.
Ideally, you'd want to drill the holes with a method to minimize the break-through burrs if at all possible. Steel or SS bristles would probably clean the holes fairly efficiently. I would think that poking the brush into the holes would be more effective than running it thru the length of the tube.
If I were confronted with this problem in *steel* tubing, I'd probably use a Dremel stone or sanding drum, but if a miniature flap wheel was available, that'd probably work better.
WB ............
Reply to
Wild Bill
"Wild Bill" wrote in news:41f7074d$1_1@127.0.0.1:
That got me thinking. Weiler Corporation "
formatting link
" makes abrasive brushes that are designed specifically for deburring parts. I've used them in auto operations on a machining center with great success. Running them by hand would be just as effective.
Dave
Reply to
Dave
Because he is working with a tube that will accept another tube immediately after the holes are drilled, I suggested he use either a drill or preferably a reamer from the end of the tube with a tool extension rod as needed... That way the inside of the tube is guaranteed to match the ID he needs and the burr is effectively removed.
As someone else also mentioned, making sure the feed rate of the drilling machine is controlled could almost eliminate the burr as well. The bit wants to "jump" through the last little bit of material and that cuases a heavy burr. If the bit was kept at a constant (slow) feed rate, then the bit would not "plow" through and the burr would be wafer thin and minimized. Even a solid "cleanout" rod could probably be used to deburr the pieces at that point rather than a reamer...
Poor tube is gonna be sanded, drilled, reamed, poked and burned to a crisp by the time we all get done with it, huh?
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022
formatting link
V8013
Reply to
Joe AutoDrill
formatting link
The one-pass tool will do front side and backside deburring in one shot. I've seen them in action, and they do work. Unsure of cost.
Reply to
Tom Needham
I know these work well on flat or almost flat surfaces, but he is doing the drilling in a rathe small tube. These devices don't really work well in those circumstances.
Reply to
Joe
Joe, I disagree. Im my experience the cogsdill burraway tools work well when deburring holes that go into or out of a curved surface. In fact, my first experienvc with these tools was using them to deburr holes in tubing. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Eric,
I can agree that they work well on some tubing, but I think this application is a rather small tube. In other words, the ID curve is probably small enough to make the deburring tool hit only on the "sides" of the hole but not the "top" and "bottom" if viewing the tube horizontally.
The cutter works on a spring action if we are both talking about the same device... And more pressure is applied to the thin wall aluminum tube when it is sprung in farther as would happen on a tight radius of a small diameter tube...
Then again, I've been known to be wrong often so all of my theory-thinking above may be worthless.
Regardless, I think the best bet to deburr the inside of a small tube is to run a precision reamer or drill down the tube from the open end. As long as that tool is .001 to .002 oversized as compared to the second tube that will be inserted into the first that was drilled, you will get a great fit and all the burrs should disappear more quickly.
That method will work on any tube that has a semi-smooth interior as long as you can get a reamer or drill with an extension long enough... And it won't really matter what the burr size is so a feed controlled drilling machine might not even be necessary.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr.
formatting link
V8013
My eBay:
formatting link

Reply to
Joe
Hey Joe, not to be contrary or anything but I just finished a job that had .244" dia holes going through a .500 dia aluminum part. Deburring the hole with a regular countersink doesn't work bery well. But the spring loaded Cogsdill Burraway worked great. The secret is using a tool that fits the drilled closely and messing with the setscrew that controls tension on the blade. These joles were on the O.D. of the part. I.D. holes can be harder to deburr right so your suggestion of having as small a burr as possible by controlling the feed is a good one. I have rounded the first cutting edge on the Burraway tool. This is so I can deburr the inside of the hole without doing anything the the outside. Sometimes the jobs I do require minimal visible edge breaks for cosmetic reasoms. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Great to learn about these tools from someone who has used them! Thank you for the insight. We are always getting inquiries on hole drilling (that's what we do!) and deburring operations... One of these days, I'll simply buy one of their tools and test it on various materials, tubes, etc. for some first-hand experience too.
Cogsdill makes a burnishing tool which is pretty cool. We use ot for some oil impregnated bushings on our machine... I am pretty sure they are made to be used on a drill press, etc. but I've put a handle on them and use them manually. Great quality tooling IMHO.
Reply to
Joe

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.