Filling holes in sheet steel

i am looking to fill some holes about 3/8", irregular shaped, in 1/4" thick
steel plates. Anyone have any suggestions for filling in these divots?
They are deflection plates at the firing range for the local PD. There is a
4x4 angle iron riser, 3/8" thick, bottom of the "v" facing the shooter. The
angle iron holds two 8x18, 1/4" thick, plates angled away from the shooter at
45 degrees to each side. The plates and riser will deflect typical pistol
rounds, but not rifle rounds. Rifle rounds haven't penetrated, but do create
pits. I'd like to see if there is a way to fill in the pits without having to
replace the entire plate or riser.
Any help would be appreciated.
Ray
Reply to
CusMarsh
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I'd take some 1/4" thick squares of steel maybe 2" thick. Take an angle grinder, and trim them so that they have edges of around 15-20 degrees.
Now trim any protruding metal away with angle grinder, and stick on with epoxy.
I think this should work OK.
Try before use in anger.
Alternatively, fill with weld (MIG, TIG?) and grind off.
Reply to
Ian Stirling
If the plates can be removed, it would be very simple to weld up the holes with a stick welder or MIG.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Bondo.
Because any other attempt at fixing the problem will work just as well, if they keep shooting 30-06s at the plates. If they keep on doing that, they're gonna have to go to thicker plates. I would think at least half inch.
Jim
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Reply to
jim rozen
I would just fill the dings with weld bead and grind smooth. If the plate is only 1/4" and has held up reasonably well, I'd check to see if the plate is something other than plain mild steel. I doubt if 1/4" would take constant fire for an extended period of time, the target zone really takes a beating. If so, the welding should be done with SMAW (stick) welding, rod to be selected to match the steel. I'd guess at least a 7xxx series if not something from the hardsurfacing group.
If they are just dings, you could spot heat them with an Oxy-Acet rosebud and smash them flat from the back side. You would need a bucking weight on the ding side, a 20# post hole driver would be just about right, handles and all.
Whoever does the welding needs to have LOTS of ventelation and use a proper mask while working there. The entire area will be coated in lead dust.
Cheers.
CusMarsh wrote:
Reply to
Roy J
Somehow from the original post, I had the impression this was a 45 degree backstop.
Jim
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Reply to
jim rozen
1/2 inch won't stop a 30/06 (don't ask how I know!). Unless it's T1 or amor plate, It will take 1 inch min thick mild steel to stop an 06 bullet. head on.
Mike Eberlein
jim rozen wrote:
Reply to
mikee
Wirefeed welder with hardfacing wire.
Gunner
"25 States allow anyone to buy a gun, strap it on, and walk down the street with no permit of any kind: some say it's crazy. However, 4 out of 5 US murders are committed in the other half of the country: so who is crazy?" -- Andrew Ford
Reply to
Gunner
Im afraid that epoxy will not hold in this application. Not even the good stuff.
Gunner
"25 States allow anyone to buy a gun, strap it on, and walk down the street with no permit of any kind: some say it's crazy. However, 4 out of 5 US murders are committed in the other half of the country: so who is crazy?" -- Andrew Ford
Reply to
Gunner
Preheat the plate to 450 F and weld up the divots. Cover and allow to cool slowly. This is assuming the plate is medium carbon armor plate. The preheat and slow cooling are to prevent cracking, 450 F won't anneal the plate, so it'll still be hard. If it is simply mild steel, the preheat and slow cooling aren't necessary, but won't hurt.
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
shooter. The
Are you saying the plates are deflecting bullets to the left and right? If so, are all the riser equal distance from the firing line?
This may not be a solution to your problem but try getting the used grader blades from the works/road dept, tuff, hard and free. Overlap and weld to make larger deflectors. Or use the blade as the riser, with the edge toward the shooter. Or, use the blade as a sacrificial riser protector, flat toward the shooter.
C
Reply to
CROQ
Thanks to all who replied.
I was thinking along the lines of either filling in with a stick welder, or drilling out the affected section, cutting rod to match the diameter and welding in place, then grinding smooth. A smooth surface is paramount. The pits present the problem of back spatter, and at 3 yards that can put quite a sting on someone.
Incidentally, 5.56 was used. Rifles weren't supposed to be used on that particular range, only pistols.
Reply to
CusMarsh
Make sure you know what material is used in the plates before you start.
CusMarsh wrote:
Reply to
Roy J
On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 15:24:37 -0800, Roy J wrote something ......and in reply I say!:
Asking, not fighting. Why not GMAW (MIG)? There are quite a few specialist wires out there. **************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Imagine a _world_ where Nature's lights are obscured by man's. There would be nowhere to go. Or wait a while. Then you won't have to imagine.
Reply to
Old Nick
i used to make biathalon targets....It's always surprised me how much damage a simple 22 will do... While these shots were dead on, a mild steel plate of 80 burnelle hardness will deform massively with repeated hits. I used AR360 quench hardened 1/4 inch steel plate. This was hard enough to shear a bullet without deforming....a 30-06 went right through it! This plate is most likely at least hardfaced - like the ones we were using.... When I tried to weld in holes on these plates with hardfacing rods the mass of the plates cooled the welds down too fast and the hardfaceing became VERY hard and brittle...] I wound be very surprised if these plates could be welded without annealing them as they are very likely not plain mild steel!
Just our of curiosity tho what defines "armour" plate? Is it hard throughout or similar to the AR I was using?
In case AR is a local term...means Abrasion Resistant and is hard only on the outside...not brittle...very hard to drill...
henry
Reply to
weco
Mainly because you'd have to buy a whole roll of that expensive stuff. With stick, you can get a package of a dozen rods, plenty to do the job, for lots less money.
Gary
Reply to
Gary Coffman
On Mon, 01 Dec 2003 01:35:50 -0500, Gary Coffman wrote something ......and in reply I say!:
Ok. Yep. Did that! And yes it hurt. But I figured I had plenty of uses for the stuff. I am building up a loader leading edge that has worn ($500 to replace!) and have plenty of wear surfaces and lots of rocks to wear them on!
**************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
Imagine a _world_ where Nature's lights are obscured by man's. There would be nowhere to go. Or wait a while. Then you won't have to imagine.
Reply to
Old Nick
jim rozen scribed in :
I'd say weld the holes over and then remount the plates as 60 degrees instead of 45, gives them more chance to deflect the round instead of having to absorb as much energy, which they cannot do without bending
swarf, steam and wind
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Reply to
DejaVU
CusMarsh scribed in :
5.56 NATO? good thing (or bad) that the plates were at 45 degrees. flat on (form less than 50 meters or so) you'd just have 5.56 sized holes (but no splatter). been there, done that. my favourite target was the 2 inch steel pipe flagpole on the shooting range. always got a couple through it from 100 meters during warm up. drove the sergeant nuts
swarf, steam and wind
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Reply to
DejaVU

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