Finally figured out and did encoder shaft

It seems you're not entirely confident in the U.S. Digital encoder installation. I suppose that's why machine manufacturers generally use
enclosed, industrial-duty encoders. There are numerous producers of quality enclosed encoders which include sturdy bearing supports, internal signal conditioning circuits and offer many mounting options. There are many other features such as dirt and liquid-tight seals, various output signal options etc.
By coupling a decent quality enclosed encoder to the mill spindle, you'd have essentially no concerns about disk alignment, runout or proper mounting of the individual components.
Having a few ruggedized encoders on hand, along with a good counter/tach DPM can be very handy for checking all sorts of machine functions (mentioned previously).
I didn't have any trouble finding an abundance of new surplus industrial encoders some years ago, for use with a few DRO displays I was working with. I wanted a couple to tear apart, and found quite a few used ones on eBay in the $5-$10 range. The majority of them will probably work well with just 5VDC, but many have fairly wide power input ranges of ~5-30 VDC.
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WB
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"Ignoramus12759" <ignoramus12759@NOSPAM.12759.invalid> wrote in message
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wrote:

Consider the possible and likely failure mechanisms, and balance the consequences against the added expense of monitoring.
Initially if the encoder sensor output looks clean on a scope you probably aren't dropping counts. http://club.myce.com/f61/eye-pattern-195197 /
http://i.cmpnet.com/digitaltvdesignline/2006/2007/06/Monster3C.jpg
As it ages and collects dirt or shifts out of alignment you could lose either signal. Can EMC2 compare the commanded and measured speeds and trip an error if the difference exceeds limits?
If you want a simple hardware monitor you could divide the encoder counts by 4096 with one of these: http://www.fairchildsemi.com/ds/CD%2FCD4060BC.pdf and clock a bidirectional counter down from the divider output and up from the index. http://www.intersil.com/products/deviceinfo.asp?pn=CD40193BMS Display the count output with LEDs and occasionally check to see if it has drifted off 0000 (all 4 off), or really that its normal pattern is changing.
Also you could trigger one-shots with the encoder pulses and light green LEDs with the outputs. This would detect a complete failure of either encoder.
These could be connected to the controller to give error inputs that it can poll occasionally instead of wasting its time looking for pulse edge transitions.
jsw
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