Installed encoder

One encoder on Y axis installed. Y was the most accessible axis and I already opened up the encoder box on it, so it was an easy choice. I
will from now on test with Y axis, as opposed to X axis. I will try to make it a one axis CNC machine.
Might want to disconnect the timing belt to keep myself safer.
http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Bridgeport-Series-II-Interact-2-CNC-Mill/12-Encoder-Installation-On-Y/
Anyway, seems like tomorrow will be a great time to hook up that PC with EMC2 and start working on configs.
i
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http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Bridgeport-Series-II-Interact-2-CNC-Mill/12-Encoder-Installation-On-Y/
Looks good. Not sure how you centered the encoder. Ones I've used on different applications are centred using sleeve with tapered ends. Like here:
http://usdigital.com/assets/general/E4%20Assembly%20Instructions.pdf
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Kelly, the answer is that I did not use a centering tool, but the hole diameter in the mounting plate is very close to the shaft diameter. On a second thought , I will call them for such a tool.
i
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Ignoramus7096 wrote:

Well, you can, but don't try to tune the servo response with no load, you will end up having to re-do it later. Just start out with the P gain low. First, with servo amps off, move the motor by hand and make sure EMC's DRO reading changes in the right direction. If not, invert the sign of INPUT_SCALE in the .ini file for that axis. Once you have the direction of motion right, you can then enable the servo amps. They may run away if the output direction is wrong, so be prepared to E-stop. If it does run away, then either reverse the motor wires or invert the sign of OUTPUT_SCALE. Now, it should hold position. You can start making jog moves to see how well it performs. At this point you want to read http://wiki.linuxcnc.org/cgi-bin/emcinfo.pl?PWM_Servo_Amplifiers
This was written for the PWM servo system, but almost all of it is applicable to the PPMC and velocity servo amps, too. One complication is if the velocity servo amps are not well-tuned, you have to figure out which bobbles are due to the servo amp and which are due to EMC's PID tuning. You can contact me for hints on how to decipher that.
Jon
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I would add one thing - initially, reduce the power-supply voltage available to drive the motors, or put a big power resistor in series with the motor, enough to slow things down and reduce the forces when it gets away.
Joe Gwinn
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I agree. I have a pretty big task, which is to connect encoder to your boards, connect analog output to the drive, make EMC read encoders, send signals, etc.
That in itself can easily take a week or two.
The first thing I will do is, as you say, make sure that EMC can read the motor's position.

I will definitely do so once I get there.
i
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