Flare brake lines?

typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:


    Is this because of something you did in a past lifetime? B-)
    I had two buses (interurban types, not VW) fall off the jacks while I was under them. On the second one, I heard the "creak" and rolled out from under it, as the stand on the far side compressed the cobble stone enough to get past CG. "Fall down, bounce on shocks." Missed me, I was 21 and nie invulnerable. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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wrote:

I can become too distracted by diagnosing the problem or having to communicate intelligibly with a helper to remember to double-check that the emergency brakes are on and the opposite corner wheel chocked on both sides. It's easy to forget that Park doesn't restrain the vehicle when one drive wheel lifts off the ground.
I've never needed to remove all four tires at once until I had to bleed the entire brake system.
-jsw
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-0400 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    I must not be that "good" - I seem to start with "handbrakes, chocks, jack stands ... now what is the problem?"

    Hmm, I don't recall ... oh wait (it has been a few years) - the reason I don't recall any difficulty with that, was I only did that at The Shop, and we had a hoist. Which had its own set of hazard issues. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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on Sat, 21 Mar 2015 07:39:51

Even high-hour pilots can become distracted from their habituated routine by problems and fly into the ground, that's one of the reasons for the Cockpit Voice Recorder and the Stall and PULL UP! warnings. They have this reminder of their priorities: "Aviate, Navigate, Communicate" https://www.pea.com/blog/posts/6-pilot-rules-that-everyone-should-live-by/
We considered the effect on situational awareness while developing advanced aviation electronic aids for the FAA at Mitre. (I just listened.)
The Red Baron died from a dumb mistake, and I'm not immune.
-jsw
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-0400 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    There is a saying that the Newbie makes the mistake then says "I don't know it wouldn't work." The experienced user "I forgot that doesn't work", while the Guru says "..and that still doesn't work." -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Sat, 21 Mar 2015 20:50:52 -0700, pyotr filipivich

You were nigh dead/maimed, too.

Exactly. ? With the exception of putting vehicles on the rack (hoist), which have to be rolled to fit, every single vehicle I exit has the emergency brake set every single time. Dad taught that to me at a very, very early age. Get in the car, put the seat belt on and remove the emergency brake. Get out of the car, set the brake and remove the belt. It's automatic. USAA doubles my medical coverage amounts in my insurance if I ensure that everyone is buckled up, too.
I always work on the flat; won't go under a car on a hill. But I don't always have chocks. I do demand a jack stand, plus the jack as a backup, whenever I'm under a vehicle. I've seen local people lose legs to cars falling off jacks and I swore I'd never become one of the casualties to that simple mistake. If jack stands aren't available, I stack concrete blocks and tubafores up until it's safe to crawl under.

I never removed the wheels while adjusting or bleeding brakes, either. Early on, with drum brakes in the rear, if you removed the wheels, the drum could work its way off while bleeding the other wheel cylinders, and that created an even worse mess when you popped a wheel cylinder and got brake fluid all over the new shoes, backing plate, hardware...
--
Always bear in mind that your own resolution to
succeed is more important than any one thing.
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08:42:35 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    We'd pulled the engine out of a VW van in Cairo. Told Dave to put it back. He attempted to slide the engine back in, balanced on a bottle jack (all we had with us). It did not work, and he "only" cracked a tooth when it hit his face. I sent him to bed, said I'd take care of it.     The next day, rather than attempt to move the engine into the van, I blocked up the engine on bricks, then had two guys push the van while I manhandled the transmission to align. "easy peasy" - if a bit longer.
    It was a heck of a trip, the starter motor on the 1959 Mercedes touring bus failed, and we had to push start it every time, until we could get back to Germany. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Sun, 22 Mar 2015 09:21:12 -0700, pyotr filipivich

Are you as impressed with quality Cherman engineering as I am?
--
The Road to Success...is always under construction.
--anon
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14:51:23 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Some German Engineering is good, some of it is "fussy" - sometimes overly so. And some of it was Krap, mit einem K.
tschus pyotr
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Sunday, March 22, 2015 at 11:52:57 PM UTC-4, pyotr filipivich wrote:


I guess all Porsche, Audi and Mercedes Benz expected "quirks" that were alw ays there will continue to always be there with the newer models.
I guess with learning french and german you can look-up recipes for medieva l styled bread and beer or cured meats.
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    All I can say is "Lord have mercy."
tschus pyotr
Gott hilfen und wir leben. (God willing,and we live.)
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On Sat, 14 Mar 2015 08:45:29 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Good!

I think you're right. UTI didn't teach that to me, either. I think we flared a couple brake lines once, and spent more time on honing and flushing/bleeding.

They use that damnable Math Voodoo stuff in there! <shakes head> Come to think of it, I think we lost a couple guys (out of a dozen) in the first couple months of Electronics had been into play for a short while when I retired from the field in late '85. I learned everything I could from the Mitchell manuals Electrical sections. And Echlin (NAPA) had some free courses, all of which I attended. I loved electronics (stereo buff back then), so it's the path I chose after screwing up my back while wrenching. Newer courses surely teach a whole lot more of Ohm's Law than I got in 1972. Either that or they're criminally negligent. IIRC, I had a tougher time in the electrical section at UTI, and that made me pursue it avidly to become better skilled; druthers being that I master _it_, versus the opposite.
That said, far too many current mechanics and electronics techs are merely board swappers. I was taught to troubleshoot to the component level in Coleman College's Computer Electronics Technology course. I just wish I'd stayed at it longer. Damned corporate takeovers. SKF gave me some nice going away presents, though, when I told them that cubicle life wasn't for me.
--
Stoop and you'll be stepped on;
stand tall and you'll be shot at.
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On Sat, 14 Mar 2015 07:52:17 -0700, Larry Jaques

I learned a lot more about things like flaring lines in high school than they taught at trade school, but our high school was much better than most. We consistently had the top grads at trade school. Frank Mader and Gerry Fry were EXCELLENT instructors, who were, first and formost, excellent technicians. I saught to emulate them during my teaching years.
Teaching automotive Mechanics in high school is a real challenge because they tend to say "we'll never make an (engineer, electrician, plumber,or whatever of this duffus, so let's put him into auto mechanics" This means the auto instructor has to bring them up to speed on their physics - electrical/electronics theory - hydraulics, their math (ratio and propartion as well as measurement) and make them into electronic technicians/plumbers/machinists/welder-fitters - the whole works - before you can make a mechanic out of them....
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The local trade school recently turned their Diesel shop into a computer lab, so there'll be no more small engine repair courses. Welding is the only night class left that isn't an art or craft. A lot of my machine shop stuff came from auctions of school shops being repurposed into something more 'relevant' to a dumbed-down service economy.
When I was in high school the college-bound kids took drafting and wood shop and really learned from them since we competed to outdo each other. However auto shop was for parolees from Juvie.
-jsw
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On Sat, 14 Mar 2015 12:47:48 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

When I said "trade school" I meant post secondary - here in Ontario that is Community College - a requirement for apprenticeship eading to the required licence or certificate of qualification - which is REQUIRED for all regulated trades -electrician, plumber, mechanic, all regulated trades here.
In high school they no longer have "auto shop" - it's now "transportation technology" and instead of learning to rebuild engines and transmissions they build motorized skate boards
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wrote:

Here they overlap: http://www.ccsnh.edu/academics/running-start
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On Sat, 14 Mar 2015 11:45:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Goodonya, mate.

Exactly. The general population thinks of mechanics as dumb grease monkeys. Nothing could be farther from the truth. It takes a good brain to be a good mechanic, a field which is in constant flux. We had to be very flexible and ready to learn each week.
--
However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.
-- Sir Winston Churchill
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

If you cover the line make SURE it has some type of sealer or protectant under the cover. Any moisture under the covering will increase the speed that it rusts.
I like using alloy lines but if the customer says no I will install steel and coat everything I install with a coat of sealer. I spray the rest with a "custom" mix. Lanolin, beeswax and bar/chain oil, mix it together while heated, brush on and let harden. Basically the same type of item as Waxoyl or Fluid film for a LOT less $$$. I also use it on body panels.
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

The places where I sprayed LPS-3 through the large holes in the cover shield didn't rust.
This isn't mine. The water-trapping clips are in the center of the picture where the plastic fits tightly against the metal.
http://i973.photobucket.com/albums/ae220/Snafu246/DSC00786.jpg
This is the problem area at the rear of the shield. Mine doesn't look as bad.
http://i973.photobucket.com/albums/ae220/Snafu246/DSC00794.jpg
The thread these came from: http://honda-tech.com/honda-element-cr-v-156/brake-fluid-leaking-how-bad-3064081/
Between the retaining clips the lines still have the factory paint, or the shiny plating where I've scrubbed it off to check them. Most of the clip-covered areas showed only white corrosion from the plating, like his but not as much. The badly rusted area was in the splash zone ahead of the rear wheel, and covered by a short unperforated section of the shield that the photo doesn't show.
-jsw
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On Sat, 14 Mar 2015 08:45:29 -0400, Jim Wilkins wrote:
<on-topic stuff snipped>

Now that Radio Shack has crashed, perhaps the defense department should commission someone to come up with a modern version of the 101-in-1 project kits, and sell them for just enough so that people think they're worthwhile.
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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