Coating for acid exposure?

I have a job rebuilding a bottle filling machine used to fill quart and gal lon bottles with various acids. Need something to coat the steel frame with
to try to prevent as much corrosion as I reasonably can. Carboline epoxy p aint over a zinc rich primer comes to mind but I was wondering if something like the urethane bed liner would hold up to the acid exposure. Anyone eve r try something like this to protect from acids?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Contact Rhino and Line-X and ask them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

SWAG: Porcelainize the exposed parts, since nitric doesn't eat glass? Lesser acids would be easier to protect against, but WTH. Maybe this link will get you further in your search. http://www.porcelain-industries.com/porcelain-coatings
--
Stoop and you'll be stepped on;
stand tall and you'll be shot at.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, March 11, 2015 at 3:04:13 PM UTC-7, Gerry wrote:

What comes to mind are Teflon (PTFE) or silicone. If you are dealing with strong acids, there should be a fume hood and controlled airflow, to limit fumes and remove any droplets in air suspension.
Glass is attacked by HF, and stainless will rust if exposed to HNO3, most paints are attacked by H2SO4...
It's possible to get Teflon heat-shrink tubing, or silicone hose, in a variety of diameters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
whit3rd wrote:

Heat shrink would just conceal the corrosion, unless you can guarantee a hermetic seal. I'd guess some sort of epoxy paint, or maybe even enamel, very heavily applied and maybe a couple coats, would probably be better.
There probably are specialty coatings for this sort of environment.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.