Flare brake lines?

Jim - one possibility: go to a local auto parts dealer that sells "Haynes Repair Manuals" and get a copy for your car. The section labeled
"hoses & lines, inspection and replacement" should provide useful data.
Hul

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On Wed, 11 Mar 2015 12:40:30 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"
Rust? Must be the salt. Living in CA, I never saw rusted lines.

Um, ouch. Yeah, pass. ;)

Working with old brake lines is a brass coated bitch. Good luck getting a solid double flare with the now brittle tubing. I much prefer to work with all new tubing. Perhaps look into the possibility of annealing it prior to working with it? I haven't heard of it, but it has been a long while since I was wrenching. <shrug>
Tips:
Work super clean. Fully steam clean the area prior to working on it. Use flare wrenches only. Dem tings is TIGHT and round off at the slightest provocation.
If you decide to reroute the tube, watch for things like abrading positions, heat from the muffler, rocks from the tires, etc. Shielding and padding are both good workarounds, but some lifts catch different points than you might think, so be aware.
Make sure to use the exact double-flare kit for that line size. I've seen guys try to use SAE tools on Metric lines and fail every time. One guy crimped a line so the flow must have been half what is was. (someone left a note for the service manager) Brakes are a life saver, so I don't fark around.
Before/After photos, please!
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

Many imports have bubble flares instead of the double flares common on domestics.
Go get a length of Nicopp or Cunifer (same alloy different companies) It's great stuff, bends easy, flares easy, doesn't rot. It's more money than steel but less than stainless which is a PIA to work with.
Not hard to run the line yourself with this stuff.
OR you could go with the precut sections of steel and just couple them with the correct parts.
--
Steve W.

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I want to know my options before I ask the inspection shop what they will accept, and have several good examples to show them I can do it. They trusted me to replace bad ball joints and brake rotors myself and helped with the Ford's intermittent electrical problem.
It looks like coupling in a new section is possible if I can make good flares in the vehicle's tubing. So far I've made decent practice ones on replacement line with the cuts squared and chamfered in the lathe, to isolate the potential problems. I have a mini tubing cutter that cuts cleanly and will fit the tight space but I don't want to wear it dull. Double flaring is turning out to be tricky and error-prone like welding.
Here's an example of mixed reviews on the next step up in tooling: http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t 3006
The vehicle line is straight for several feet in front of the rust-out, so I could cut out a test section and try different tools and techniques like annealing on it.
-jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

Cunifer is legal in every state AFIK. It is being used on a lot of the high dollar imports and I've been using it in NY for years, it's in the inspection regs as legal.
Factory line is soft steel tube, I've never had to do anything other than the steps below.
To do a good flare isn't hard IF you follow a few steps.
1 CLEAN the outside of the line. Dirt/rust/crud is not helping. Neither does the coating that some after market line has.
2 cut the tubing square as possible.
3 chamfer it inside and out to eliminate any burrs and clean up the weld seam.
4 REMEMBER TO INSTALL ANY FITTINGS BEFORE YOU ATTEMPT TO FLARE THE LINE!!!!!!!
5 Set up the tool and it's adapter properly.
6 LUBE the line and forming tip.
I've made good flares with just about every flare tool I've ever used. From the cheap chinese ones to my mastercool unit. Some are easier than others but if you do the steps they work.
This is the one in my tool box http://www.mastercool.com/pages/flaring_tools.html
It's basically a hydraulic version of the tool you have.
--
Steve W.

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