Flaring Tool?

Hi guys,
Thanks to some very helpful advice from members of theis NG I am about ready
to put my new/old Quincy 5hp Compressor into service. After installing a
new check valve in the tank I now need to cut an flare the main tupe that
goes from the head into the compressor. I cut the tubing to length but I
have not found a place that carries a flaring tool large enough. The OD of
the tubing is 3/4", Inside diameter is 5/8". Does this seem correct. I
looked in MSC and they had a flaring tool for over $100.00. I figured I
would ask for help from the knowledgeable mebers of this group.
Thanks for the help.
Joe...
Reply to
JB
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I take it the flaring tool intended for plumbing is too small. If not, you can pick one up cheap at the local home center.
Flaring tools intended for air conditioners can usually do 3/4" tubing. Do you have an HVAC contractor buddy?
Reply to
AL
"JB" you can buy a 5/8" flaring tool (one piece) at a plumbing supply or a larger hardware store. cost should be around $8-10 dollars. It works by inserting in to the tubing, and hitting it with a hammer. works great, just go slow so you don't split the tubing. Ed
Reply to
edanderson
Al,
Thanks for the advice. I will have to make friends with an HVAC guy :-).
Thanks.
Joe...
Reply to
JB
Should always anneal the copper before flaring.
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
I have a couple laying around the shop. They aren't expensive. If you have a lathe you could turn one out in 30 minutes or so. Most any professional plumbing supply carries them. Make sure the copper hasn't been work hardened or it will split. Just bring the end up to a red heat and quench to anneal it. Bugs
Reply to
Bugs
Drill a block of hardwood the size of the tube id and take a roundover bit around the inside of the hole. Cut a saw kerf from the edge of the block to the hole and clamp this around your pipe with the edge flush with the block. Set the ball end of a ball pein hammer on the tubing and strike it. You may need to anneal the tubing first.
Reply to
bamboo
This tube better not be copper! It will work-harden from vibration and crack. Plumb it with steel!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Yikes, you mean all the copper tubing on my 1961 IR compressor is going to burst any time now?
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Likewise, the tubing from the pump to the tank on my last 2 compressors, a DeVilbiss and a Quincy, have been copper .. - GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Ned, I'm shocked! Obviously I am mistaken that copper can't be used but I have had it fail here a couple of times and a compressor rep. told me not to use copper again for that reason. I can't say my Quincys vibrate more than they should. Maybe you have magic! Maybe your installation minimizes the effects of vibration.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
That's probably it there. If both ends of the tube are connected to things which are mechanically coupled to each other (by other than the copper), then there's not a lot of vibration as seen by the copper. It's when one end is moving relative to the other that you'll see the work hardening.
That said, I don't use copper for that sort of application, but my compressor does.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
I dunno, all the copper on the IR appears to be straight from the factory, including interstage cooler, centrifugal release, and the output line from the compressor to the tank check. There's not much vibration - I assume it'd be more likely to be a problem if you could see or feel vibration in the tubing, but everything is solidly mounted and well supported (other than the damn belt guard).
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
The compressor is circa 1972 and the pipe is copper.
Reply to
JB

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