Food safe kinda low temp solder

On Tue, 31 Mar 2009 23:16:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:


95-5 contains no lead. It's 95% tin, 5% antimony.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Mar 2009 23:53:36 -0500, Don Foreman

You and I won't freak if there's a tiny fraction of lead in the brass or solder, because we realize that the numbers are so small it really doesn't make a lot of difference - there isn't enough exposed area at the joints or in the valve bodies to let much of it leach into the water. We're talking 1 or 2 parts per billion in the first few ounces of water that was standing overnight, then it runs clean after that - flowing water doesn't have time to leach any lead.
But that same 2 PPB is enough to totally freak out the Do-Gooders. They are trying to get all older Los Angeles Unified Schools campii declared practically Superfund Sites because of old brass drinking fountains - the kooks are pushing to rip out every inch of pipe all the way from the street and replace it with 100% Certified Lead Free parts - at a huge price. The janitors are supposed to run water and rinse out the fountain valves every morning to solve the problem.
If they don't flush them and a tester comes by to take a water sample that day, that 2 PPB in the first ounce sets off every kook into total rabid "They're Trying To KILL OUR KIDS!!" mode.
Why is Common Sense so uncommon?
--<< Bruce >>--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Others have mentioned silver solder or similar, if your electric griddle is like mine, perhaps rather than wire you could just bend a piece of stainless thus:
_ _ |_________|
And then you could use the empty tuna can if you intend to discard the grease or a glass custard cup if you wished to preserve the drippings.
This way there is no toxic issues for her and she also might appreciate the ease of cleaning.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Most silversolders melt at considerably below the melting point of brass, and most of those readily available are now Cd free. I'll bet you'd have a hard time finding Cd-bearing silver solder in Kalifornia. I'd send you some nice Cd-free food-safe 56% silver alloy but you pissed me off recently though I only vaguely recall how or why. Oh yeah, it was the tweak about ohmygawd buying guns rather than tobacco. Macht nicht, you can afford to buy what you need.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Mar 2009 00:50:17 -0500, Don Foreman wrote:

:-)
--
http://www.wescottdesign.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are at least four solder options: lead-free solder (95 tin, 5 antimony), which is OK for water pipes but not for acids; silver-bearing soft solder (95 tin, trace silver, 4 Cu) which is probably OK for you; silver- bearing high strength soft solder (95 tin, 3.x silver, trace Cu); and hard solders (so-called "silver solder" usually a silver-copper alloy, without tin, and VERY high temperature required).
The first two are sold for plumbing. The third is common for Pb-free electronics. I think that third option is also approved formally for food contact, but you'd have to get the MSDS from a manufacturer to be sure. The fourth, you can get in small quantities from jewelry craft houses, larger quantities (over a pound) a welding shop will help you out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.