Dribble to Flood Cooling on a Lathe

This is the followup/continuation of the thread "Dribble Cooling on a lathe" started 26 May 2009. where much of the setup is described.
As I experimented with dribble cooling, a few things became apparent.
1. Even a dribble yielded a nice puddle in the chip pan, and it was a nuisance to clean it up because of the fine chips. It would be nice to be able to wash the pan down.
2. Dribble really doesn't work when facing. One needs a flow, so one can hit the face. And the work flings coolant.
3. Parting off wants a lot of coolant, a flood really.
4. The lathe came with a shop-made 5/16" hole in the right front corner of the chip pan. Why this modification was made soon became apparent, as this corner is where the coolant from parting off collected while running with the hole corked. I think the prior owners put a bucket under the hole.
So, I decided that I need to be able to vary between dribble and flood as needed, and that the bucket approach was likely to be clumsy, so I needed to make the 5/16 hole into a real tygon tubing fitting, so I could fit a drain leading back to the coolant pump.
To do this, I drilled the 5/16" hole out to 3/8" using a unibit, used paint stripper to remove the battleship gray paint around the hole, polished the steel with a fiberglass brush, and soft soldered a short piece of 3/8" copper tubing into the hole using a big propane-air torch that runs off a picnic bottle. (One must use tinners flux to solder steel; plumbers flux won't work.)
Now the lathe has two drains, one large (1/2" tube) and close to where the cutting is done, the other a bit smaller (3/8" tube) at the lowest point, both leading back to the coolant pump.
As a test, grooved and parted-off a 0.75" diameter 1018 rod using HSS bits and cutoff blade. All went very smoothly, without noise or drama. The sidewalls are a bit rough, but the groove bottoms are quite smooth.
I also added a T in the tygon tube from coolant pump to the needle-valve manifold, providing a coolant feed to a handheld 1/8" nozzle that I use to wash the chip pan down, washing the chips into the coolant pump basket strainer.
The next thing is to make a tube with a little brass nozzle soldered to the tip, so I can generate a high pressure low flow stream. The 1/8" tubing is a bit springy, and vibrates with machine vibration, and may restrict flow to the nozzle, so I'll use 3/16" copper tubing.
On the manifold, I have two needle-valve assemblies, one with 1/8" the other with 3/16 compression fittings, so it's easy to change (or replace) tubes and nozzles.
Probably the next project will be a shield to catch flung coolant. I even got some on my eyeglasses.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Check out the style splash guards used on OmniTurn retrofitted CNC lathes. The design works quite well on manual lathes and is easy to build yourself.
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno
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I think I recall this from a few years ago, but I'm finding only full enclosures. Have you a URL or two in mind?
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Very distant picture unfortunately...they have screwed up their visuals over the years...
http://www.omni-turn.com/Pages/Attachment%20Gallery/pages/AHCCRO~4.htm
Its simply a plate that clamps around the spindle boss...and a hinge with a heat bent piece of acrylic that goes over the top of the chuck. It works quite well.
There are a number of manufactures of clear plastic swing over splash guards out there, but Ive found it just as easy to make my own.
And yes..I use Full Flood cooling whenever the lathe is cutting anything besides brass and plastic. Good old fashion nasty high sulphur cutting oil is in each of my lathes. And I dont every have any problems with burning out inserts bits etc etc.
Gunner
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno
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Thanks. I did see that photo, but didn't realize it had a chuck shield.

I've seen these guards, which are intended to satisfy OSHA, don't mention their performance as a splash shield, and cost $200 to $300.

I thought of oil, but didn't like the fire hazard in my basement, so I went to soluble oil. I would guess that oil is less prone to being flung, but makes a bigger mess when it does.
Joe
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I bought mine on ebay for much less than that, very well worth the money. It was $45, IIRC.

Much bigger.
i
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That's better! What kind?

I was testing parting off with dribble to flood today. Running in reverse with upsidedown 2mm sgih blade under power feed, I was being too stingy and/or missing the little slot with the coolant, and the 1018 steel wadded up and broke the carbide tooth with a bang.
Next time, new tooth and far more coolant, no problem. But blue stuff everywhere.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Sometimes you just have to do it right the first time, and clean up afterwards.
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno
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This gets old fast on the third time. So, there will be splash shields.
Dribble/flood is still better than mist.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Yes..it is. <G> I installed (28) 400psi secondary pumps in a shop last December. But then..I controlled the output well enough one could stand with the door open and watch the activity. Ya simply gotta do whats best for da makinery.
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno
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Any proper CNC lathe has a high-pressure coolant nozzle well-aimed to discourage kibitzing.
Joe Gwinn
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It was a nicely bent acrylic shield with a hinge, I could not possibly do as nice job bending. I can take a picture if you want.

seems like climbing?

I would go faster once you have some sort of a shield.
i
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I'll probably make one, but a photo would be appreciated.

Climbing? I'm not sure what you mean, but this is not a mill.
When I looked at the groove left by the dearly departed carbide insert with bright light and magnifier, there was a very obvious circular gouge of increasing galling of the sidewall, growing deeper in a single turn, until it overwhelmed the carbide insert. The wad of gathered 1018 steel was a bit wider than the groove, leaving torn gouges in the sidewalls. The wad was cyclically welding to the sidewalls and tearing loose, until the wad was too big to chew.
Giving it a sufficient flood prevented this cascade of troubles.

That is the plan. I've been running at ~500 rpm. I now understand why modern CNC lathes (now called machining centers) are fully enclosed, with a sliding door in front. Milky coolant everywhere while running, so you cannot see a thing.
Joe Gwinn
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I will take a picture, I thought that I had one.

Your round part climbed the cutter, was my supposition.

yep
They usually spray coolant at higher pressure too.
i
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Thanks.
Yes, but the question is Why?
Insufficient lubrication, so a wad of steel grew and welded to the sidewalls of the 2mm groove. The lathe had the oomph to keep on going. Not so the carbide insert. Glad it didn't mangle the blade.

Full enclosure required for sure.
Joe Gwinn
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Joe Gwinn, here are the pictures of the chuck shield. Sorry that they are not too good, I struggled with lighting. It was not easy to take a picture of a transparent object on varying, dull dark background.
http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Clausing-Colchester-13-36-Master-Lathe/12-Chuck-Shield/
i
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Thanks.
<http://igor.chudov.com/projects/Clausing-Colchester-13-36-Master-Lathe/12-Chuck-Shield/>
The only solution is a lot more light, far beyond the ability of any on-camera flash. But I was able to figure the photos out anyway.
As I thought, the shield covers only the chuck body, and seems a bit too short (along the bedway) to catch coolant flung from the jaws. They do make a larger/longer model, if I recall.
How well does it catch coolant? If I recall, you are using a soluble oil of some kind.
Joe Gwinn
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No, it does cover the jaws as well.

Very well, after I added that rubber flap. Without the rubber flap it would fling some coolant on my legs.
i
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On Sun, 05 Jul 2009 22:30:47 -0400, Joseph Gwinn
<big snip>

If you haven't seen it already, you might want to look over Steve Bedair's splash guard for his 9x20. He just heated up some Plexiglas and bent it into shape. See:
http://bedair.org/9xshield/shield.html
May give you a few more DIY ideas.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Yes. This is my general approach, although I'll probably use metal not wood.
Joe Gwinn
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