Flat belt on Logan lathe

I've finally got my little Loagan Model 200 up and running. Seems to be
nice and tight, cuts the nicest collection of steel wool shavings I've
seen. But as soon as I try for some heavier cuts, the belts either slip
or pop off. The Logan has a 25 pound belt guard on the top that actuates
a cam to tighten up the flat belt. Easy to adjust the bolt but how
tight to set it? I can't get at the belt to see how much deflection it
has once the guard comes down, can't do it with the guard up because
the cam isn't actuated. Belt appears to be some sort of fabric deal, not
leather. Help??
Reply to
RoyJ
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I tighten the belt so it won't slip then put a nice heavy chunk of stock on top of the cover so it doesn't do that annoying bounce. Usually that means tightening the screw until the cover just lifts. Make sure the belt isn't greasy.
John
Reply to
John Hall
I've been a bit leery about going that tight. I still have enough left so the cover has a distinct 'clank' when I lower it down. Sounds like you are letting all the cover weight tighten the belt, add weight to take care of the bounce???
John Hall wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
yes, that's the idea. I may be wrong, but it seems to me that the weight of the cover is what tensions the belt.
John
Reply to
John Hall
Since it is so easy to readjust (set screw at rear of cover), adjust the tension just tight enough for the work you are doing. If the belt slips, tighten it up a bit.
Also, when the lathe is not in use, release the tension. Either leave the cover up, or shift the belt so it is cockeyed, on the small step of both the spindle and countershaft pulley. The belt will last much longer.
You might also want to check out the following resources:
Logan Lathe Users Group
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Logan Lathe FAQ
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Logan Actuator Co. online store
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Reply to
Scott S. Logan
I was cutting a 6" backing plate for a 3 jaw chuck running in either the mid or high speed pulleys, lathe seemed to plenty tight to make deeper cuts, it would just stop the spindle cold. I did figure out how to check tension of the tight belts by going in from underneath. After I tightened thing up I seemed to have about 3/8" deflection with strong 2 finger pressure. Sounds about right.
I figured that taking the tension off was a good plan, have been doing that.
I bought the Logan from a estate, used by a hobbist. Unit seems to be pretty tight and straight for being around 60 years old. (SN in the 21,000 range)
Scott S. Logan wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ

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