Good/Bad Idea

Hmmm, I know some good old boys that don't think you need to use a new, never used propane tank for filling tires. In fact they believe
that a perfectly good tank for filling tires is one that has propane in it. I personally have never used propane to presurize a tire.
W.W. Grainger sells a device to replace the valve in a propane tank so you can use the tank for compressed air. It has a pressure relief valve, schrader valve, 1/4 inch port for a pressure gauge, and a quarter turn valve to cut off the pressure to the port where you connect a hose. The smell of the methyl mercaptan really isn't a problem if you are using the tank for filling tires.
Dan
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wrote:

I have a manifold with the fitting for the propane valve on one side, on the other side there are: pressure gauge, schraeder valve stem, female quick connect, and a ball valve. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On 25 Dec 2005 21:35:30 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm,

I want to see the video of the blowout caused when the nail goes through the steel belt and propane starts to leak through the sparks at that point. That'd be better than watching an old movie of some fool getting tossed into the ceiling by a non-secured truck split rim. Calling Mr. Darwin!
---------------------------------------------------------------- * Blessed are those who can * Humorous T-shirts Online * laugh at themselves, for they * Comprehensive Website Dev. * shall never cease to be amused * http://www.diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------------
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It could happen, but you are likely to wait a long time before seeing a video of a blow out caused by propane in a tire. See < http://psc.tamu.edu/safety_alert/03_12_99.htm for information on the upper and lower flamability limits of propane and more important for information on tire sealants. Lots of those use propane to inflate the tire.
Dan
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wrote:

We did it for many years up in the north woods on truck and logging tires. Never a boom that I know of, even when changing them, but the tire guy were always informed.
One should recall that much of the Fix a Flat cans had propane or butane etc as the propellent until recently.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
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I put my old 50 gallon tank in the boat shed and ran a line to my new 60 gallon compressor in the shop. I was concerned about wearing out the new compressor but the engineer at the local commercial compressor sales company told me that while it does lengthen the run time it reduces the cycle time so you come out about the same. There is a small drop in efficiency with big tanks because with longer run times the cylinder heats up more and the actual volume of ambient temperature air goes down. The advantage for me is that I don't have the big pressure drop from the long run to the shop..
--
Glenn Ashmore

I'm building a 45' cutter in strip/composite. Watch my progress (or lack
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wrote:

I put a 60 G tank on my basement air network in anticipation of installing a main compressor out in the garage when it's finished. Currently I fill the system from a little portable electric compressor. Once it brings the system up to full pressure, it runs for no more time than if the "surge tank" was not there, but it does allow for intermittent very high consumption with minimal pressure drop, and it will provide a cushion when the air is (eventually) coming through 200' of 1/2" black iron pipe. (The little compressor has been running during work hours for six years now with nothing but normal maintenance.) -- --Pete
http://www.msen.com/~pwmeek /
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Greetings:
If you have a long compressed gas pipe run, you can use the second tank at the remote end as an "accumulator", or buffer to supply intermittent high volume demand that the pipeworks otherwise couldn't supply. In between the demand, the system catches up as the remote tank refills at whatever flow rate the pipes allow.
Regards, Jim Brown
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I'd say it's a particularly good idea if you intend to use lots of air in short bursts, then have some time for the tanks to refill. The only downside that I see is that you will have more connections to keep from leaking.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------
Steve B wrote:

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The two hardest things on a motor are starting up and overheating
Most compressor motors are meant to run without overheating (there is a term specifically for the heavy duty that the application that a compressor motor mafes. And its called "compressor duty"
Running Longer and starting less should be easier on the motor than the frequent starts
Steve B wrote:

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as
Good idea, increasing storage capacity and allowing the compressor to cycle less.
Make sure that the tank is rated for the pressure involved. Some of the larger compressors cycle on @ 150 PSI and off @ 175 PSI, which is often beyond the pressure of smaller compressors. Could be the tank is marginal for the application, if not under rated. It's not uncommon for single stage compressors to cycle off @ 125 PSI.
Harold
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I have two older (pre-screamer) traditional Craftsman compressors. I have them connected in tandem so I will have higher volume when I use the sandblaster or other tools that need higher volume at high pressure.
I don't use any check valves at all. The compressors each have their own, between the tank and the compressor outlet port.
My shop is over 100 feet long, between my machine shop and an automotive work area on the other end. I put a compressor at each end and my air line (pvc pipe) runs the length of the shop with a tees and two QC outlets every 10 ft. There is also a dirt and water trap at each outlet station.
I have one compressor set at the max pressure cut off and the second set a few lbs lower so the second seldom starts and if it does, it is not at the same time (both compressors are on the same circuit breaker so I can turn them both off when I leave the shop.)
I have been warned by others, that PVC is not a good idea, but since my shop is so long, I needed a cheap method and so far I have not experienced an problems. We will see if there is when the weather gets well below freezing. The only problem area I can see is in the water traps at each QD tee.
--
My experience and opinion, FWIW

(the other) Steve
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Typical PVC pipe air installation problem sequence: No Problem, No Problem, No Problem, No Problem, No Problem, No Problem, No Problem, No Problem, No Problem, BANG, shrapnel, problem. If the shrapnel happens to hit you or some other person, a very expensive problem (or it all becomes someone else's problem, as it's no longer a problem for you).
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by

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Steve B wrote:

I have done exactly this, and it does beat up the compressor if you are using a lot of air. If you use large volumes sporadically, I don't see a problem. If you leave it on all the time and have sloppy air fittings, it will be dead in a year.
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If you leave it on all the time and have sloppy air fittings,

next question:
I buy those cheap quick connects at Home Depot. They leak a lot, or some do and some don't. What's a good source of quality quick connects without paying an arm and a leg?
Steve
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You local auto parts store. Milton is the name-brand. If you are more than a casual hobby user, there are industrial-grade variants that last longer and flow more air. But for most people, the M-type (M for Milton) is probably what you are already using.
- - Rex Burkheimer WM Automotive Fort Worth TX
Steve B wrote:

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Steve B wrote:

I buy from msc or mcmaster and have no problems, but understand they have a lifespan. a few years in a busy setting, a few weeks in a wet one.
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yourname wrote:

Milton and most other name-brand couplers have replaceable parts. Heavy use will wear the steel balls into the brass body, make the holes oblong. Then you toss 'em. Lincoln makes a steel-body M-style coupler. If you can find those they last a lot longer. Buy a few sets of replacement seals when you buy them.
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On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 19:11:07 -0800, Steve B wrote:

As long as the tank is serviceable, it will only take longer to fill up both of them the first time. What will probably happen is that you'll get a longer on-time and longer off-time. (IOW, you'll have more air use before the compressor kicks in again, and when it does it will take longer to get to the turn-off setpoint.)
There's a possibility that the motor is so close to the hairy edge that it could overheat during the run cycle, but if it doesn't, the benefit is longer off-times.
PV = TK, you know. :-)
Cheers! Rich
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