Good Idea/Bad Idea?

Should I, or it even smart to hook a volume tank to a compressor that
already has one? I have a two horse Husky, brand new. I have the old
volume tank off the deceased Sears oil less screamer.
Is this helpful in any way, or does it just make the compressor run twice as
long filling up two tanks?
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
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That's what I've done. While it doesn't really help once the compressor kicks in, it does seem to delay the onset of the compressor and make for a more consistant flow of air. Plus, I've got mine on a quick disconnet so that if I need remote air (filling tires at the end of the driveway for example) I can grab the extra tank and go.
Plus, you've got the stuff you need to do it. It's not like you're going to pay anything to do it, and it's just cooler than having one tank...
Peter
Reply to
Peter Grey
It keeps the motor from cycling on and off so often. It will run a little longer when it's pumping up.
I went to an auction where a Ford dealership was liquidating. They had a 2 hp single stage, single cylinder compressor running the whole 8 bay garage with two air powered air-over-hydraulic car lifts. The tiny compressor was hooked to a 500 gallon tank that looked like a leftover boiler tank from the 19th century. It was put together with huge rivets - no welds.
-- Jack
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Reply to
Jack Hunt
This is really helpful if you put the second tank at the other end of the hose, where it sort of acts like a capacitor. Specifically, I have my compressor in the garage, but my driveway is steeply sloped from the garage down about 40 feet to where it is flat where I work on my cars. I roll out my hose down to the flat area, then set up the second tank down there.
This eliminates the pressure drop that you typically get at the other end of a long hose...
Reply to
Emmo
Yep that is what I do. I run 100 feet of ½-inch air hose from the machine shop to where I am working. there it goes into a 5-gallon portable tank, with another 50 foot hose to the air tool I am using. Other wise the pressure drop is so great over the 150 feet distance, that my ¾-drive impact won't put out any more torque than a typical cheapo' ½-drive harbor freight impact. It works so I keep putting off laying 1-inch black iron pipe to carry air to the garage area.
Reply to
Diamond Jim
Guys, I love it on here - top info.
I had never thought of doing something like this. I have a small 2HP compressor that I wheel out of the garage & a permanent 3HP one in the garage, it never crossed my mind to run an airline to another reservoir. Will 'play' at the weekend.
Have a good one, one and all. Balders (goes back to lurking again)
Reply to
Balders
You've been given a lot of good info, particularly using the tank as a capacitor on the end of a long run of hose/pipe. However, a major consideration is how old is the tank and what sort of shape is it in which may not be easy to establish. The last thing you want is for it to let go suddenly. billh
Reply to
billh
Let me ask. Are both of the air compressors using their motors to run or is the main larger compressor doing all the work and the secondary portable just a resavor?
Don D.
Reply to
Don D.
One is a total complete new Husky compressor. The other is only the tank from a deceased Sears compressor that all machinery has been removed from.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
If you do that, get a second regulator. Run the local tank and the interconnecting hose at high pressure, maybe 120psi and use a local regulator to drop this to 90psi for the tool.
If you keep the local tank at 90psi "tool line" pressure, you'll barely see any benefit from it.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
I don't understand the concept here. Ninety psi at the local tank seems to work fine for me...
Reply to
Emmo
I am a bit lost, too. Would that work like a concept of two water towers. If one is drawn down, the other one doesn't start to empty until the first reaches a preset level?
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
It depends on the tool you're using. If you're using a small tool, it'll work fine. However the stored energy in the tank goes up as the square of the pressure, so if you can store a higher pressure in there then it's effectively a bigger reserve to draw on. Going from 90 to 120 could nearly double the effective capacity.
Reply to
Andy Dingley

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