goofy motor bearings

I just tore down a early 1960s 3/4 HP 3 phase motor to examine the insides. It's from a drill press and has grease fittings on it, even
though it's just a 56 frame motor with a 5/8" shaft. There's nothing special about the motor other than it has a factory paint job that matches the rest of the machine.
Anyways, the thing was full of grease, yet had shielded (6203zz I think) Nachi made in Japan bearings installed. They seemed too new to be original,and why the thing was packed with grease baffles me. Nothing looks modified in any way.
The only thing that would make even a lick of sense is there were unshielded bearings in there originally and that's why there were grease ports. Why the thing was pumped full of grease later is a mystery.
Anybody seen anything like this before?
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That's better than no lube ever, like some of the machines I bought used. The trade school students had broken most of the oil cups off my lathe.
--jsw
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 12:33:18 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

And the broken nipples had been left in the holes? That sounds like the machines I used in 8th grade metalshop. <sigh>
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Energy and persistence alter all things.
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who beat on the tailstock spindle like an anvil horn?
It was the only Heavy 10 among a batch of 9" South Bends and I couldn't pass it up. The dealer swapped the spindle but it's not a perfect fit. I haven't seen another 10L since for less than twice its price.
When I bought it there were still industrial suppliers in town. One had the proper Gits oil cups in stock, and a shiny new Eagle No. 66 oiler: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Eagle-No-66-Oil-Can-5-tall-Rare-Brass-Cylinder-Oiler-USA-Advertising-/222102076858?hash=item33b650bdba:g:Gq0AAOSw2GlXI5g5#ht_174wt_868
--jsw
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 20:48:56 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

braindead fellow students.

OMG! Are people really paying those prices? Dolts.
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Energy and persistence alter all things.
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I have one - the long or down in a hole is a bit long and would tip over when most oil was gone. I solved that. I went to the toolbox and got a 'washer' of lead. Dropped in the tank and it sits nicely. The long tube might have been added after sales for an operation.
Martin
On 6/10/2016 9:09 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

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On Fri, 10 Jun 2016 21:11:46 -0500, Martin Eastburn

Might not be so bad IF it was really a brass oiler, but that turkey is plated steel.
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2016 22:37:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Januwine "brass look" finish, eh?
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First of all, a full brass anything would melt down in a few years as the zinc would be dissolved by airborne chlorine. Brass is pretty, but using it in the shop it can be tricky.
Martin
On 6/10/2016 9:37 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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My yellow #66 oiler doesn't attract a strong magnet. --jsw
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I have no idea where such an idea comes from! I have lots of little various-geometry 'shim devices' I've had for decades (for model-making), all made of plain yellow brass -- some as thin as 0.001".
I've got a number of non-ferrous tools, too, for working with explosives. Most of the commercial ones are bronze, but the ones we have made in-shop are mostly plain brass.
NONE of them have "melted down"... nor even corroded beyond plain "tarnish".
Come to think of it, none of the brass decorative items in my home have "melted down", either!
Lloyd
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On 06/12/2016 07:13 AM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

The only place I have had brass fail in that manner is when it was in contact with aluminum. As I have learned, using brass bolts threaded into an aluminum housing is a really bad idea.
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Bob Nichols AT comcast.net I am "RNichols42"

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in message

These hoses have aluminum end fittings: https://www.apexhose.com/lightweight-hose-zero-g/
I put Ox-Gard on the end that threads to the brass faucet, to see what happens compared to the other end attached to plastic.
LPS-3 has protected aluminum in contact with brass on my antenna pulleys exposed to rain water, but didn't help much on a shop-made outdoor faucet handle exposed to chlorinated town water. The outer end of the handle, a brass rod pressed through the aluminum, has only a little corrosion. --jsw
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On 06/13/2016 09:37 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

In my case, the bolts, which were clamping an antenna rotator to the mast, still looked fine, but lost much of their strength and broke after a few years.
--
Bob Nichols AT comcast.net I am "RNichols42"

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_leaching I've replaced several faucet washer screws that were affected.
--jsw
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Copper goes nuts with iron/steel joints or placement. Ionic depletion of the zinc and copper creates corrosion in the ferrous and cupric joint.
Try having a tank of Ferric chloride. (sometimes used in PCB etching) and drop in (caution with shield!!!) some Aluminum foil. Fire and light!
Martin
On 6/13/2016 8:22 AM, Robert Nichols wrote:

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It depends on the oil on the cans, chlorine in the air and acids in the oil and working fluids. In working shops it is safe. In static or a home shop it is possible like the pipes in the house corrode inside less than the outside in places.
Acids abound. Paper has it, wood has it, air has it. Water has it. Depends on the shielding it has (oil) and the like.
Martin
On 6/12/2016 7:13 AM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

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My stock of brass rod, sheet and tubing slowly loses its original shine but that's all. Sawed cutoffs from October 2014 show only a faint hint of tan from handling.
--jsw
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I haven't tested mine, but I know it is oily. That likely keeps the zinc protected. Might be a silicon bronze. That is a yellow gold like color. Strong like steel (not as and many things different) - but one can mill it and file it and hammer upon it.
Martin
On 6/12/2016 6:46 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

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On 06/08/2016 11:13 AM, Cydrome Leader wrote: ...

If you got a piece of gear with grease zerks, wouldn't _you_ grease it on the presumption they were there for a reason?

Sure, happens not frequently but on occasion. Are the bearings really sealed or just shielded in the latter case there is still a reason.
--



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