Nasty electric motor

Today, I got a chance to save the machine I need to repair or make a shaft for.
The first
order of business was look at the drive motor that was for all practical
purposes, seized.
Yanked it off the lathe (1 year newer than me), pulled the end bells, bearings
spin. WTF?
Armature firmly stuck in field coils, tons of crap in the end bells. Obviously
this isn't
a TEFC motor.
After 20 minutes of washing out with water and tapping with a dead blow, I got
the
armature out. I've never seen a motor tied up like that.
The lathe is used to turn friction materials just in case you wonder.
Just wanted to say, it is always worth a look inside before you give up on a
motor.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Loading thread data ...
It is indeed. I had a 5 hp drip proof given to me years ago because it was locked up. Guy said it had set out in the weather and the bearing froze.
I pulled the end bells only to find good bearing just like you. But the mud daubers had glued the armature to the coils. I just kept it wet for a few hours blasted it out with a garden hose.
Reply to
Tim
OK, my smirk: Was at a tent sale of returns from Northern Hydraulics. 2hp TEFC motor, brand new at (TA DA!!) $.50, (yep, half a buck). Bought it on the spot. Took it home, ran perfectly ..... for about 10 minutes before it started heating up. Took it apart, gave the bearing a smart rap to seat it fully, been running my table saw for years.
Tim wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I saw this very same repair procedure described as: percussive maintenance, recently.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
Did that with an electric drill after it had been dropped off the step ladder. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
At my place this is called "judicious application of superior force"
Wild_Bill wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Speaking of electric drills, while screwing down drywall for my machine room, my cordless drill quit charging. A quick google found that the charger for this drill is flaky. I have the battery pack attached to my variable voltage / current limited bench power supply atm. Wonders of wonders, the drill is fine, the charger is dead.
I really want to use my 14.4 drill since the 18v one is a wrist killer.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 18:19:04 -0400, the infamous Wes scrawled the following:
The first
purposes, seized.
spin. WTF?
this isn't
I take it that you believe you saved the motor by removing all the detritus from the innards? Bueno, bwana.
-- Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't. -- Eleanor Roosevelt
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I put it back together today, didn't hang it back on the lathe. I'm a bit bummed, the shaft I thought I could make another one of is part of a gear / clutch basket made out one piece of metal. Gonna have to weld it. There is a bearing on the shaft that I can't get off non-destructively so I'm holding off until morning. Going to bring in some aluminum foil to wrap it with, didn't feel like watching rags burn.
I did a bit of welding practice on some scrap today. I don't weld that often so wanted to practice a bit.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
for. The first
purposes, seized.
spin. WTF?
Obviously this isn't
I got a Bridgeport J head out of a guy's garage. It had been an auxilliary spindle on some kind of huge planing mill, and was still attached to an enormous aluminum dovetail piece. The dovetail was nearly a foot wide.
Anyway, just cleaning the thing up, the motor seemed to spin easily, so I decided the bearings were probably OK, and just put it all back together. As soon as I hit the switch, the motor spun a bit and seized up with a horrble screech. So, I tore it apart. I was totally astounded! The entire inside of the motor was packed with several-inch-long magnesium chips. I was able to fill a small trash can with the chips. I torch tested them, and they were definitely part magnesium, but might have been duralumin or aluminum-magnesium alloy. The bearings were easy to find at the bearing outfit. Amazingly, the motor didn't seem to mind being packed with sharp, combustible chips!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson

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