Electric Motor Maintenance

I have a motor off of a table top drill press that had never been
used.
I wasn't going to risk hooking it up the AC and turning the drill on
because the motor had spent some time outside and I have no idea what
the condition is of the internal workings.
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I'd appreciate any pointers to sites that explain how to clean and
what to check on an electric motor like this.
Thanks.
Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
Searcher7
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In article , Searcher7 wrote:
Mark the end bells so that you will know which goes on the correct end of the motor. Carefully take it apart. If it has ball bearings, and as it appears, it has been damp they may have to be replaced. If sleeve carefully clean them and old dry oil from the shaft and housing. If the motor has been damp set it aside for a few days in a warm place or use a hair dryer or heat gun to thoroughly dry it out. Check the starter throw out on the armature to make sure it has not frozen up with rust, clean, and lightly oil. Check the contacts on the end bell for corrosion and burnish them gently. If you do not have a burnishing tool you may use crocus cloth if you are very careful to clean up the residue. Reassemble and you should be good to go.
CP
Reply to
Pilgrim
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First I'd check if it was made in China or Taiwan. If so, it would go in the dumpster.
There are plenty of used US-made motors on craigslist and such. I've tried to fix these Chinese motors and it's not worth my time.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
I don't know what end bells are but I hooked it up and it definitely works.(It runs smooth and quiet too).
The problem is that I don't yet know what I'll do with it because I just found out that the motor pulley from the drill press has a 1/2" diameter bore I.D. and this motor has a 5/8" diameter shaft, so I couldn't finish putting it together. (This explains why the drill press/motor had never been used before).
Turning down the motor shaft or boring out the pulley's I.D. seem like bad ideas.
So if I find some more pulleys the question is do they have to match each other and also do they have to be the same size as the originals.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
Searcher7
They're those bell-shaped things that the shaft goes through that are fastened to the ends of the motor.
That's entirely up to you. They _do_ have to match the belt, of course, put pick whatever size gives you the speed ratio you want.
Have Fun! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
They don't have to match exactly, but there is this consideration: the sum of the diameters of the driver & driven pulleys should be the same for all steps. That is, if Df1 is the diameter of the lowest (1st) step of the front/driven pulley, and Db1 the diameter of the 1st step of the back/driver pulley, then:
Df1 + Db1 = Df2 + Db2 = Df3 + Db3 = Df4 + Db4
If this isn't so then the length of the required belt will be different between steps. If changing the speed involves re-adjusting the belt tension, then this will not be as important. I.e., differing belt distances can be accounted for, to some extent, in the adjustment. In some drill presses the motor position is fixed and the belt distance must be the same for all steps.
HTH, Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
Searcher7 Inscribed thus:
Normally both pulleys are identical ! One is mounted inverted !
Reply to
Baron

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