Grinding a blank lathe tool for parting or cutoff

Ive used some 3/8 & 1/2 square tools that were factory ground to about 1/16 on the end for parting and cutoff. They work great but when I tried to reproduce one from a
blank, well the results werent very good and it takes forever to grind away that much material. Has anyone ever ground there own ?
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On Dec 8, 2:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@conninc.com wrote:

Yes. Push harder. HSS grinds very slowly until you apply a certain amount of pressure, then the grinding effectiveness suddenly jumps way up.
John Martin
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On Dec 8, 12:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@conninc.com wrote:

Sure, but the easiest way is to get a dedicated cut-off blade holder and cut-off blades for the big stuff. For itty-bitty stuff, I still grind minis from 1/4" square blanks. Yeah, it takes awhile. Wouldn't care to try it on bigger blanks, either. I use 40 grit belts on the belt grinder for roughing, I'd probably see if I could get something around 20-30 grit for wheels if I was stuck with a bench grinder.
Stan
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snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:

I use my Makita hand grinder for roughing. Look butt-ugly, but works just fine.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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snipped-for-privacy@conninc.com wrote:

I knew a fellow who had to custom make some special shaped lathe bits for a factory. They furnished some blanks which were close to what they wanted but needed modifying. What he had to do was soften them up, grind them as desired and re-harden them. The "softening" and the "hardening" is in the cooling process.
IIRC: A quick quince will harden them and a very slow cooling will soften them.
He used plain old lime like you use to alkalize your lawn to cool them very slowly. I think he first got them cherry red and jambed them into the lime and left them half a day or so to cool. I think water will make them too brittle. Oil may be what you need to get it back to tool-hardened condition.
Don't hold me to the exact above, but that's roughly the process and I'm sure we have several here who can tell you for sure!
Al
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snipped-for-privacy@conninc.com wrote:

The welding grinder sounded like a good idea. If you have a surface grinder, a 1/32 cut off wheel to slice the bit would be very quick. We keep an old surface grinder permanently set up with a 7" x 1/32 abrasive cutoff wheel. Great for shortening cap screws, dowels and anything else ferrous and hard.
Wes
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snipped-for-privacy@conninc.com wrote:

Yes several. I just "hog" out most of the excess with an abrasive "chop" saw, and finish up on a surface grinder holding the bit in a fixture with the desired side clearance. I'm pretty sure there are some pictures on my home page. http://home.earthlink.net/~lhartswick Can't tell you the titles right now. (would have to change browsers) ...lew...
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If you'll select the proper wheel, HSS grinds quite well. If you're using the typical pedestal or bench grinder with the wheel that came with the machine, you can expect more than your share of misery. The wheels are too hard to function well for the material, and there's nothing you can do to improve their performance.
I have hand ground turning tools for well over 50 years now, including parting tools. I don't own a commercial one, preferring the performance of those I hand grind.
You have received some excellent advice regards using a parting wheel to eliminate the majority of stock when starting with a blank. Still, you must hone your skill to achieve good results afterwards. Get a proper wheel and stay the course.
It might pay you to download a large file that was compiled from many of my posts on the Chaski board some time ago. I discuss wheel selection, wheel dressing and HSS grinding in detail, including grinding chip breakers. If you are not well versed in the art, it may prove useful. Or not! :-)
Here's a link: http://www.savefile.com/files/915454
Harold
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Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

Downloading even as I type , Thanks Harold ! I have gotten so much info from this and the other metalworking groups I read , it has helped me more than I can say . The Internet Rocks !
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snip----->

Welcome! :-)
Hope you find it useful.
Harold
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Harold and Susan Vordos wrote:

*ALL* knowledge is useful ...
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    I finally got around to downloading it -- and discover that it is in ".rtf" format -- probably the worst to read with my usual computers. I guess that I'll see whether the Mac has a reader for that.
    ".pdf" would have been a good format on almost any computer -- or if it is only plain text in there -- what would have been wrong with a plain text file?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

.rtf = Rich Text Format
MS Word should be able to open it. Or OpenOffice can, if you're into that commie open source stuff like Linux. ;-)

Text has limited formatting capabilities. .pdf would be best except that Adobe's Distiller isn't cheap. If you can 'print' to a postscript file (.ps), there's a ps2pdf utility (that damned open source stuff again).
--
Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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    [ ... ]

    That much I knew. It was just the lack of knowing a program which would run on my system which could open it.

    That may be -- but MicroSoft Word won't run on my Sun Blade 2000 (nor will the parent OS, Windows), so what it can open on other systems doesn't help here.

    How about Sun's Solaris 10? Yes, Sun's StarOffice does open it, and it is a partly proprietary version of OpenOffice, but which does a few things that OpenOffice can't do because of proprietary formats.

    I didn't see anything in it which really *needed* fancy formatting. Plain text would have been fine -- and a much smaller download as well.
    PDF at least has excellent compression to make up for how complex the file is compared to plain ASCII.

    I've used ps2pdf (part of the GhostScript package) many times -- for converting scanned machine manual pages to something easy to share with others.
    Thanks,         DoN.
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This crapVista machine wanted to open it with the latest Word product, but I won't use another MSshit product that I haven't used before (earlier machines & OSs).
So I did the Open With and chose the somewhat trusty WordPad, and did a Save As to a .doc file, and everything looked fine.
I know that's not a solution for DoN, but I mentioned it in case anyone else prefers to avoid new spit/yakMS programs.
--
WB
.........
metalworking projects
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Wild_Bill wrote:

Now that I've seen it, I think text format would have been best. It ends up as an 86K text file. Converting to a PDF (not everyone has the tools to do so) makes a 590K file. The original is 11.6 megabytes. I don't even want to think about what an MS Word .doc would look like.
Text is good, particularly if there's no special formatting, fonts or graphics to be preserved.
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Paul Hovnanian snipped-for-privacy@hovnanian.com
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When I looked it over after savig as a WordPad (not Word) .doc, it looked fine but I didn't realize that the images weren't in the file.
But the text without the images is about 88kb.
I've been reading the Chaski boards occasionally for several years, so looking up Harold's images wouldn't be difficult for anyone that might have some trouble envisioning the grinds made on the cutting tools. http://www.chaski.org/homemachinist /
The Chaski forums/message boards are chock full of good info, provided by real pros and metal hobbiest/enthusiasts types on nearly all aspects of metalworking.
--
WB
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Unfortunately, the way the board is now operated, one must be a registered user to see images that are hosted on the Chaski board, which mine are.
Registration may seem like a bit of an imposition, but once Marty made the change, spamming of the board came to an abrupt halt. We were being hit daily with several posts, some of which were XXX in nature. That's not the purpose of the board, so the change has been a wonderful improvement, lightening my burden considerably.
Anyone with an interest in mechanical devices is welcome----application is generally approved within 24 hours. Marty is the sole authority for approval, and does an outstanding job at screening the riff-raff.
Harold
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I think it was a worthwhile change to require registration for access to the Chaski forums, Harold.
All that registration requires is a legitimate email address from an interested person to become registered. I was a reader of the forums before the requirement was put in place, so it was no effort for me. To view the messages is unrestricted, but to see the images or comment on subjects, one is required to log in.
Anyone that's nervous about using an email address that they'd prefer to keep private for personal correspondence, can get a free email address from Yahoo or numerous other sources.
Thanks again for your detailed contributions Harold, here in RCM and Chaski.
--
WB
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metalworking projects
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snip----

Thanks, WB-----I appreciate that someone reads my ravings, such as they are.
Harold
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