Grizzly G0602

This is a 10x22 lathe with speed changes effected by moving v-belts:

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What puzzles me that there seems to be no way to relieve the tension of the high speed belt to move it from groove to groove. I had a look at the non-Grizzly clone today (trust me, it's identical) and could not work out how to move that belt except by forcing it (the slow speed belt has a tensioner which can be relaxed). Neither BTW could anyone else present.

I thought this was a no-no, bad for the belts. Can anyone comment?

Reply to
Michael Koblic
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The instructions are to release the tensioning roller to change the belt, then retension the belt us the roller. Seems pretty straight forward.

Similar to the spring loaded tensioner in my Prazi lathe.

Paul

Reply to
co_farmer

Sorry, I should read a little better before writing!

I concure with your conclusion.

Upon re-reading, there appears to be two belts! Both a low speed belt and a high speed belt. For high speed, you remove the low speed belt that uses the tensioner and place the high speed belt on the indicated pullies. With a belt as long as they show, 33 inches, it should be moveable from groove to groove.

Paul

Reply to
co_farmer

Quite a while back I used a similar lathe and found that you had to loosen the motor. The problem was not addressed in the (useless) manual. It was a real pain because you had to tip the lathe over to get at the bolts. I think that I re-mounted the motor to make it more easy to do this job. Usually I just ran that lathe on its lowest speed..

Reply to
Denis G.

" snipped-for-privacy@coinet.com" fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@z3g2000prd.googlegroups.com:

Mike, the instructions clearly indicate you don't use (or need) the tensioner for the high-speed selections; pulley A to C.

It's a long belt. Vee-belt drives don't rely on high tension to grip, so the belt is flexible and stretchy enough to hop grooves.

LLoyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 21:13:33 -0800, the infamous "Michael Koblic" scrawled the following:

It's harder on the belts and creates more vibration from the belts "setting up" in that position. I got around it on my G1012 (yes, wooddorking bandsaw) by putting link belts on it. They don't take a "set". Vibrations from the saw are much lower with link belts on it.

-- This episode raises disturbing questions about scientific standards, at least in highly political areas such as global warming. Still, it's remarkable to see how quickly corrective information can now spread. After years of ignored freedom-of-information requests and stonewalling, all it took was disclosure to change the debate. Even the most influential scientists must prove their case in the court of public opinion?a court that, thanks to the Web, is one where eventually all views get a hearing. --Gordon Crovitz, WSJ 12/9/09

Reply to
Larry Jaques

The machine in the local shop had the belt pretty tight and sitting down in the grooves. Half-hearted efforts of all those present did not suggest that the speed change would be an easy proposition.

I thought about it afterwards and wondered if in fact thay had the wrong (27.5") belt on the wrong pulleys. the way the tensioner is placed it should work for both sets of pulleys, pushing the belt *out* on the B pulley and pushing it *in* on the A pulley.

I shall go back and have another look, especially as the manager intimated they might be willing to part with the machine at a substantial discount.

I had a gear head version of a similar thing lined up at $1108, but that one comes with no accessories and I am always concerned about breaking gears where a slipping belt would bail me out. Also I understand the belt-driven lathes are, pound for pound, quieter. Plus no shipping locally. Etc...

Reply to
Michael Koblic

I agree that it is bad for the belts, and had at first thought that with the tensi ======================================================================

-- If the high range belt (Figure 40) needs to be replaced, carefully roll the belt off of pulleys A and C and reinstall the new one. ======================================================================

O.K. Looking at the drawings, this is a cogged belt (gear belt) engaging gears, so it probably does not have flanges to stretch the belt when you roll it off. And -- it looks as though it does not normally need to be shifted -- just eventually replaced when it wears out. So -- I would not really worry about it.

Overall, I'm rather impressed by the lathe as documented in this manual. It even (unlike so many of the ones which come with gearing for both imperial and metric threading) explicitly states that since it has an inch leadscrew, you can't use the threading dial for metric threading.

Enjoy, DoN.

Reply to
DoN. Nichols

The cogged belt does not move. There are two v-belts. The one on the A-side is supposed to be 33", the B side 27.5". I thought initially that the locals may have the wrong belt on the A side (as I posted elsewhere) but the manual is very specific that the A side is to be used *without* the tensioner.

I have spent the last hour on various fora dealing with the G0602. All manner of problems came up but strangely the speed change has not been mentioned once. Thus I figure that on the genuine Grizzly it is not an issue. The local machine is made (well, imported) by King Canada and may be different, although in every aspect I can assess from the manuals, pictures etc. they are identical.

One could always restrict oneself to running the lathe at 560 rpm or below. The other choice would be to install a longer v-belt for the A side and

*use* the tensioner. They are commonly available 3L belts...
Reply to
Michael Koblic

The manual in the shop was poor quality and the pictures were hard to interpret. The on-line manual (especially the pictures) is clearer:

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The relevant picture clearly shows the use of tensioner in the A position. The text, however, is clear as mud... If I buy this I shall employ someone skilled in interpreting birds' entrails.

Reply to
Michael Koblic

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