Handrail Styles - Notching on a Budget

Hi All,
I have a question please. In creating metal handrails out of 1.25" Sched 40 Pipe, what are suggestions for notching the Styles for
welding for those of us who can't afford $3-5000 machines to do this? I've tried the Hole Saw thing and that lasted all of 5 minutes before the teeth were gone.
Does anyone have any suggestions, or information on how it can be done or ways it was done in the days before the machines?
Thanks
Jim
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Papasmithy wrote:

For making a T-joint? That are two cuts with the cold-saw/band-saw at a certain distance and angle. Now don't ask me for the sizes. We had blocks at work that were used as a gage in the coldsaw with the angle stamped on it. The angle was maybe something like 35
With a bit experimenting, you'll find it out. Didn't need any grinding, just saw, weld and it looked good.
Nick
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It was done with a soapstone, a cutting torch, and grinding "in the old days" (like, yesterday, for folks who don't have money or justification for notching setups).
But, um... I'm more interested in why your saw burned up.
A: Hope you weren't using a wood saw... A good bi-metal saw should last at least ten or twelve holes in 1/4" mild steel without needing touch-up or replacement.
B: Hope you weren't turning it at wood cutting speeds. The SFPM should be pretty low for that work.
C: Hope you were using some coolant for long cuts. Overheating a saw would cause it to de-temper and dull pretty quick. It's important to frequently clear the chips from the cut, too (if the saw's cutting on the whole circumference), or the saw just clogs up, diddles on the surface, work-hardens the bottom of the cut, and overheats the saw.
LLoyd
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Lloyd,
I think it is the result of using just cheap bits. I've had them last longer and was amazed too when these got smoked that quickly. I made sure it was Bi-Metal, but I think they were just cheap (Made in China) stuff although the price I paid wasn't all that cheap.
I'll check the speed, and was using a coolant too, but perhaps speed was too high. Thanks for sharing!
JIm
wrote:

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Jim
I use weld-on fittings for my decorative rail projects. When I design the project I sit down with the list of ells, caps and joints available and plan the job using what's available. I find the material cost to be a small compared to the labor I'm charging the custormer. The resulting weld are easier to blend and give a superior look to the project. On the rare ocasions when I end up field notching I mark it with soapstone and cut with an angle grinder.
Bud
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Bud,
Thanks for the insight! What do you do about mounting the top rails to the Styles when the railing goes down a series of steps? I haven't found fittings that do that....maybe you can point me to a direction or a source?
Thanks,
Jim
On Feb 21, 1:13 pm, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

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http://www.wagnercompanies.com/view_or_download.aspx
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You're doing something wrong.....too fast....cheap hole saw.....etc.
I have done all the notching that was necessary to build a complete oval-track car - full cage w/front and rear clips - with a single, 1-3/4-inch, bi-metal hole saw.
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Thanks! I never thought of using a hole saw like this.
Learning something every day!
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Schedule 40 is pretty thick for a saber saw... I'd make a pattern to slide over the pipe to guide an oxy/acet cutting torch. It would leave a perfect kerf for stick, mig or gas welding.
Wayne

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Too fast of a drill or cheap holesaws. You have to use high quality bi-metal holesaws , and a very low RPM drill. They work fine then. I have used a crappy harbor freight version for a few years.

You can do a fair job with a heavy duty belt sander, but it takes a lot of practice. Or use the lever pipe notcher from www.lowbucktools.com
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wrote:

was holding my tongue here, but since others have mentioned jig saws and belt sander, a while ago, a couple times, i cut a "birdsmouth" onto the end of pipes by making angled cuts with a chop saw, it's terribly inaccurate, and the cut is beveled the wrong way, but it might be an easier way to remove a large amount of material quickly (rather than taking it ALL off with an angle grinder) and then finishing it up with an angle grinder, etc.. it was a rush project, instead of grinding out the bevel i just hammered the pointy tips outward enough to fit onto the other pipe and welded 'em on like that.
b.w.
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