Heat treating aluminum?

Hi,
New to this group and figured I would post a question.
Wondering if there are any metallurgist's on this group, or someone who
knows how to heat treat aluminum?
What I've got is 2024 in a "O" rating and would like to heat treat it
to at least a T3, if not higher. Thickness's I am working with are .032
/ .063 /.
080.
I know there is a way to do this with an oven and heat. I have access
to an oven that is programable and could melt aluminum. It is also
programable to step down in stages, for desired times and temps.
Anyone know how to do this? If you could, try not to get to
technical, just looking for a basic way to do it if possible? If
there isn't a basic way, that would be a good answer also.
Thanks, Matt
Reply to
Matt
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" This is an age-hardening alloy and responds to heat treatment to accomplish the strengthening (aging). See "Annealing" and " Aging". The T4 condition is attained by a 920 F heating followed by cold water quench and aging at room temperature. T6 by the same 920 F and quench followed by 375 F for 10 hours and air cooling "
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
Ed Huntress, me and Mark seem to be the top metallurgists here, not to mention the others I can't think of off the top of my head who don't post much. :)
Ok, that'll do it. Like P.M.T said - circa 1000F for a few hours, quench, age at 400 or so for as long as a day (I forget the exact scale between underaged, fully aged and overaged; it likely varies with alloy). Or you can sit it on the shelf for a month or two after quench - it will naturally age harden.
Naturally aged is called T4, I think T6 requires a work hardening step by definition. If it doesn't, then the above will get you T6.
Sounds great for annealing, and would be very helpful if you were to get into say, glassblowing :)
The trick is to heat it to dissolve the copper-rich grains (which are insoluble at room temperature) thus homogenizing the alloy, then precipitating it as an even distribution of hard particles which give strength. Oh wait, you said NOT technical?
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @
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Reply to
Tim Williams
So, if I understand the jist of it.
Heat to 920F, quench in cold water and age at room temperature for a T4 rating.
or:
Heat to 920F, quech in cold water and then heated again for 10 hours at 375F and then air cooled at room temp for a T6 rating
Correct? If yes, then my next question is how long do I heat the parts at 920F? I would think it would depend on material thickness. I have a few different part thickness's to do. They are .032 / .063 and .080. The most to do in the .032 and .063. Also, would the 10 hours of 375F change for material thickness?
Thanks, Matt
Reply to
Matt
Yep!
A few hours at least, better Google it.
Not really; especially the stuff you have is going to heat up quickly. It's a very small scale process (these particles are on the order of microns in diameter) that simply reacts slowly. Plus aluminum is very conductive.
Probably not. Again, good idea to look it up and check.
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @
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Reply to
Tim Williams

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