High temperature thread sealant

Anything better than PTFE/Teflon for high temperatures?
Just go dry or what? High temperature compressor output line... the
hose is bellows with braid over it.
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
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There are a lot of options for very high temperature thread sealants. Search on this term in Mcmaster for example.
However, teflon is supposed to go up to 500 deg. F. I am not an expert in air compressors, but I would think if the output air is that hot, something else might be getting damaged.
Reply to
anorton
Okay, found one that looks good, and reasonable price (< $50 for 4oz), thanks.
At the 260°C is supposed to be maximum.. it's starting to get soft above about 150°C.. but point taken. There's an awful lot of power (several kW continuously in this case) going into a little bit of air.
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Auto stores stock a variety of (usually Permatex brand) sealants in RTV silicone, including a variety of removable sealants. If you ever replace/repair threaded fittings, the nonremovable ones are not recommended.
Reply to
whit3rd
I simply use a teflon based thread sealer paste readily available at any plumbing shop for ALL air connections, including those on the head end. I hate! Hate! finding tape bits blocking solenoids and valves downstream in CNC cabinets.
Gunner
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Reply to
Gunner
You would LOVE the crap one company uses on fire vehicles. It is some type of epoxy sealant. Does a GREAT job sealing and locking the connections together. BUT if any extra gets loose in the system....
Nothing like stepping on the brakes with an air brake system and having NOTHING because of a blockage. BTDT , I ripped apart the entire system and resealed all of it. Also installed a few filter screens in the lines.
Reply to
Steve W.
I've used Permatex IIb non hardening, for auto gasket applications. Should work on threads. Messy, but alcohol cleans it off skin. Not much cleans it off clothing.
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Auto stores stock a variety of (usually Permatex brand) sealants in RTV silicone, including a variety of removable sealants. If you ever replace/repair threaded fittings, the nonremovable ones are not recommended.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
BIG PROBLEM ON THE HORIZON!!! I did exactly what you are talking about and the temp from the output of the compressor was too high for the braid covered hose! The hose under the SS braid disintegrated. DON'T DO IT!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
How about sealant for EGR pipe and oxygen sensor threads? Never-Seez perhaps? jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Hi, Tom, thanks for the warning.
This stuff is 300-series stainless on the inside too- no rubber. It's crinkled like a bellows so it's flexible and braided with stainless braid on the outside. It's not particularly cheap, but not insane.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Greetings Spehro, If you want high temp sealant then try this link:
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The stuff is 10 bucks a bottle, is sold by Brownells too, and is good enough that your stainless hose will be glowing red when the max temp of this stuff is reached. Eric
Reply to
etpm
Thanks, Eric!
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
I've used similar stuff at work to transport liquid helium. But it had two bellows -- one inside the other, and the space between them was evacuated to maximize insulation. Think of it as a long, flexible Dewar. :-)
But I have one short run of the what you are describing, which I intend to use to decouple vibration on a compressor from the pipes in the shop.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I"m concerned that this is why head 'gaskets' are blowing out with this Alcohol gasoline we have now. New cars likely have something that handles dual fuels but not older cars and trucks.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
They also sell sealant for Wood stoves - it is high temp RTV and is red. I've used it on my wood stove - and it stands up to red hot temps.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
Well, that's OK then! I would use Teflon, but I used a rubber hose. You might use a smear of hi-temp grease. As a lubricant, you will get the joint tighter.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Thanks, that is very handy to know about. I used to use a ceramic-based adhesive that required mixing and baking.
Reply to
anorton
Your welcome. Let us know how well it worksplease. Eric
Reply to
etpm
Had a closer look at one of those this morning (feeding a plane liquid He through a blowhole). They work very nicely- no frost on the outside.
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
I gotta ask: What is the liquid helium used for? What does it do? Was this a regular passenger plane or some military/experimental?
technomaNge
Reply to
technomaNge

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