Homemade crucibles

- Anyone need to know the secret? LOL
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!"
- Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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Tim Williams wrote:

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Tim Williams wrote:

<snip> See http://www.lindsaybks.com/dgjp/djgbk/cruc/index.html
Ad w/o pictures:
Making Crucibles
by Vince Gingery
Melting metal requires the application of heat to a container containing the metal. The container we usually use is a crucible. You can buy high quality crucibles, or you can make them. Even if you buy the best commercial grades, they eventually wear out and sometimes break. If you build the necessary simple equipment to make your own crucibles, you'll have an endless supply of quality, low-cost units of exactly the size you need.
Making a crucible is merely a process of shaping clay into the proper shape and firing it. In other words, this is about making pottery.
You'll learn about how crucibles were made a century ago, making a PVC mold, clay composition, ramming up, firing the crucible, making crucible tongs, making a concrete mold, making a mold press, safety rules and precautions, and more.
The only fancy piece of equipment you'll need is a lathe to create the wooden mold. Vince uses his metal lathe, of course, but a wood lathe will do the job.
And like all other Gingery books, this is loaded with a disgusting number of photographs and drawings, with plenty of detailed how-to "thrown in" just for kicks. In other words, this is classic Gingery practical "how-to-do-it."
If you do nothing more than dream about pouring metal someday, I think you're a fool not to have a copy of this. It's good. Get one. 5-1/2 x 8-1/2 booklet 64 pages
No. 1551 ... $9.95
Lindsay books has tons of casting information. Chastain's books are very good. US Navy manual is a basic reference source. We used it for the test in the casting class I tought.
GmcD
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Er, I'm aware that there's a book out there. I was offering key information which appears to be fully successful, for free.
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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|| ||> Making Crucibles ||> ||> by Vince Gingery || ||Er, I'm aware that there's a book out there. I was offering key information ||which appears to be fully successful, for free.
So do it!
Don't tease us, or make us beg!
Texas Parts Guy
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Tim Williams wrote:

<snip> See http://www.lindsaybks.com/dgjp/djgbk/cruc/index.html
Ad w/o pictures:
Making Crucibles
by Vince Gingery
Melting metal requires the application of heat to a container containing the metal. The container we usually use is a crucible. You can buy high quality crucibles, or you can make them. Even if you buy the best commercial grades, they eventually wear out and sometimes break. If you build the necessary simple equipment to make your own crucibles, you'll have an endless supply of quality, low-cost units of exactly the size you need.
Making a crucible is merely a process of shaping clay into the proper shape and firing it. In other words, this is about making pottery.
You'll learn about how crucibles were made a century ago, making a PVC mold, clay composition, ramming up, firing the crucible, making crucible tongs, making a concrete mold, making a mold press, safety rules and precautions, and more.
The only fancy piece of equipment you'll need is a lathe to create the wooden mold. Vince uses his metal lathe, of course, but a wood lathe will do the job.
And like all other Gingery books, this is loaded with a disgusting number of photographs and drawings, with plenty of detailed how-to "thrown in" just for kicks. In other words, this is classic Gingery practical "how-to-do-it."
If you do nothing more than dream about pouring metal someday, I think you're a fool not to have a copy of this. It's good. Get one. 5-1/2 x 8-1/2 booklet 64 pages
No. 1551 ... $9.95
Lindsay books has tons of casting information. Chastain's books are very good. US Navy manual is a basic reference source. We used it for the test in the casting class I tought.
GmcD
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On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 23:41:26 -0600, "Tim Williams"

I just checked out your metal casting pages (some, so far). Very interesting! I used to have an old Pyramid Furnace and everything needed to cast, but it was stolen before I could ever fire it. After seeing your site I might just have to build something and try it again.
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I now have 2 friends (in the Seattle area), independent of each other, both of whom are asking for my help to build or buy a furnace to do brass/bronze casting. 2 questions:
1. Does Pyramid Products have a Web site? 2. Are there any good plans that don't involve buying large pieces premade or making large castings? Ideally plans on the Web?
Thanks, GWE
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On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 09:51:23 -0800, Grant Erwin

I bought the one I had used for $50. It seems to me like I sent off for a manual (needed a crucible). I have no idea where it would be now though, but I did get one. It was a very simple design, had a little electric blower and a simple pipe burner. Never melted anything in it, but I did lite it a few times and it did get hot fast. Dont know if they would have a web site or even still in business. I did run across this however: http://www.backyardmetalcasting.com/index.html
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I remembered a series from HSM called something like "Metal Melting Furnace". It was a very good project, I remember it being really well done. I'm going to probably suggest they use that plan for now.
Weird that the Pyramid Web site went away, though.
GWE
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I could use the info...(not the book) Thanks.
granpaw
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Ok... basically, high alumina, a little flux and a slow first firing.
I have here a bowl made from grog (former alumina + clay crucible, "Mk.1") that's nicely fused (flux), yet strong (alumina). It held up to preparing a one pound batch of C630 aluminum nickel bronze last night and looks great for having reached 2200F.
Tim
-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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