how to make?

I have to make a flat plate, maybe 2x4", with a couple of threaded holes in it.
This much I know how to do with great certainty. I also need to have a pipe
handle coming off the plate at a narrow angle, 25-30° and I'd like to be able to
unscrew the pipe. What I was thinking of doing was cutting a pipe coupler at the
right angle and welding it to the plate. However, all the pipe couplers I see
appear to be cast iron. Further, none appear to be long enough. I'd like to find
a 3/4" NPT coupler made of steel that is about 3" long. Now, I am capable of
taking a piece of 1½" round steel and boring it out and tapping one end 3/4"
NPTF but I'd really rather not, it's a lot of work and I don't know if I have a
tap wrench big enough.
I looked at McMaster (handy reference) and they show no extra-long couplers.
Lots of ways to skin a cat, of course, I could just cut the pipe itself at an
angle and weld it to the plate, but it would be nice to be able to remove it if
I needed to.
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Loading thread data ...
couplers I see
Weld a pipe nipple to the plate and put the coupling on the end of that....
Reply to
Rick
. I'd like to find a 3/4" NPT
Perhaps these folks.
formatting link
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Or connect 2 rigid conduit nipples with a close nipple, weld, then cut to the angle. Your handle may not tighten up that well though...
Reply to
Rick
threaded
extra-long
Sorry, meant 2 conduit COUPLINGS : )
Reply to
Rick
Grant, all I know is that I recently threaded 1/2" NPT into steel. It was all I could do to finish the threads with a double handled wrench about 10" each way. You'll need a long wrench for 3/4".
Steve
Grant Erw> I have to make a flat plate, maybe 2x4", with a couple of threaded
Reply to
Steve Smith
pipe couplers come in both cast iron and steel. Cast looks like cast, steel looks like extra thick pipe. What any supplier will give you tends to be associated with whatever was cheapest last week.
formatting link
shows the cast couplers under the heading 'straight coupling', steel couplers under 'mechant couplings'and long couplings under 'API couplings'
Part number 46685K265 is 1-5/8" long black steel at $1.91
Part number 43245K125 is API grade steel in 3/4" pipe size , 2-1/8" long, $6.58 each (wonder what makes them so expensive?)
one comment of couplers: ASTM specs allow up to 2" (??) couplers to be EITHER straight tapped or tapered, above that they are supposed to be tapered. I would suspect that the smaller cast couplers will be tapered, the steel ones will be straight through tapped. May not make any difference to you but...........
Grant Erw> I have to make a flat plate, maybe 2x4", with a couple of threaded holes
Reply to
RoyJ
Just tap a piece of 1" pipe. Schedule 160 that is. That makes it harder to find. Did this as a kid for farm implements because cast unions would fail.
Reply to
nic
Pipe fittings are forged, are they not? I know I've welded to fittings before.
Reply to
Gary Brady
Depends on where you get your fittings and what type you get. The rough outside fittings you find in the home improvement store are cast iron. The smooth outside couplings there are steel. In the high pressure business the fittings are forged steel.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
formatting link
Reply to
Wayne Cook
Pipe couplings are not cast iron. They're ductile iron, and it's not the same animal. They can be welded. Further, pipe couplings that come with pipe are generally steel, not iron, so one of them could be used for your project. If you can't find one for pipe, an electrical coupling is also made of steel, but is generally plated.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Grumble. :-(
I think I should have said that couplings are malleable iron.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
They used to be but I question that now days. I've definitely seen plenty that didn't weld worth a flip.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX
formatting link
Reply to
Wayne Cook
snip-----
Yet another example of my incredible ability to live in the past!
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.