How To: Remove a cracked set screw

There is a cracked set screw in one of m Kwik 200 tool holders. It?s a 1/2 inch holder so its one of the most common and cheapest to find used. That
being said there aren't as many used Kwik 200 tool holders to be found on the most obvious source (Ebay) as their used to be. I hate to pitch a tool holder I already have over such a cheap part.
Here is the problem. There is a tool in the holder and its well secured. I want to take the tool out, but even a clean crisp brand new hex key just pops around like the screw is rounded, but its not. I'd like to save the tool in the holder other wise I might be tempted to press it out.
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wrote:


Try drilling out the set screw. Often one can drill a hole lengthwise through a screw/bolt which seems to release some of the tension and allows the resulting "tube" to be removed easily with an "easyout".
Even fairly hard set screws can be drilled with a high speed drill bit at low cutting speeds and high feed pressure.
--
cheers,

John B.
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On Sat, 18 May 2019 10:23:48 +0700, John B.


Have you tried a left spiral drill bit? I prefer them over so-called "easy-out" by 1000 to 1.
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wrote:


The "easy-outs" I use are a tapered square ground from a high speed tool bit. We found that the ones with the L.H. (sort of) screw thread were a bit too much as if you drilled the correct size hole the easy-out would never slip... it would break instead and getting the broken easy-out, out of the broken bolt, was even more difficult than removing the bolt itself :-(
As for L.H. drill bits, I never had access to any but they should work well. I've seen screws or small bolts get hand loose when a hole was drilled all the way through. If a L.H. drill bit was used then "Bob's your Uncle" and it would be out all ready :-)
--
cheers,

John B.
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On 5/17/2019 11:23 PM, John B. wrote:

reasonably well unless you try to drill hardened steel . OTOH there's a set of stripped screw removers out in my toolbox that came from Sears , It would probably work in Bob's case since they are a better grade of hardened steel . Got a set for rounded bolt heads too ... and they work on stripped out allen head cap screws .
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On Sat, 18 May 2019 11:23:03 +0700, John B.


I try to drill the head off the screw using a LH drill bit larger than the screw body and, generaly, just before the head coms off (at the point where tension is removed), the screw backs out.
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If the tool is sticking out by a reasonable amount I wonder if you could cool it enough to shrink it free(er). First thought was to dunk the exposed end of the tool in liquid nitrogen while keeping the holder warm, but that might be overkill. Dry ice in acetone is more readily available and might be adequate.
You'd probably have to epoxy a wrench in the set screw to back the screw out once the chill takes effect.
Please post what you try and how it works!
bob prohaska
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Is enough of the screw exposed to cut it off? The ends of dull hacksaw blades are still sharp and can be ground thinner on a wheel that's dressed straight, or better on a surface grinder. They also make good flat springs with a mounting hole.
Try an English hex bit if it's metric, or vice versa.
Perhaps you could grind the end of the next larger size hex bit until it can be jammed in. Just shorten the modified bit to restore it.
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"Jim Wilkins" <> wrote in message > "Bob La Londe" <> wrote in message

There yah go. That's what I was thinking too.. phil k.
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On 5/17/19 9:43 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:


If there is some exposed screw where it contacts the tool bit, use a cutoff disc in a Dremel tool to cut through the screw. That will relieve the pressure on the screw and should allow you to back it out.
--
Bob Nichols AT comcast.net I am "RNichols42"

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On Friday, May 17, 2019 at 10:44:00 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe wrote:

?s a 1/2

t

ol

I

I would expect the set screw to be metric.
How about finding the Allen wrench that is just a bit too large and grindi ng it so it fits?
Dan
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On Friday, May 17, 2019 at 10:44:00 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe wrote:

?s a 1/2

t

ol

I

Many years ago a friend had a similar problem. We jury rigged a edm. But my friend ended up taking the part to a machine shop with an edm machine.
Dan
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On 5/17/2019 7:43 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:



I think that ultimately the screw exerts greater pressure on the threads when I try to turn it because it is cracked. IE: Tries to expand.
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If you had to slice open the slot above the tool bit with a cutoff wheel to part the setscrews you'd still have a useable toolholder.
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wrote:




Drill into the screw with a drill that is the slightly less than the minor diameter of the thread until the drill is almost as deep as the bottom of the screw. Then go into the same hole with a flat bottom drill, still keeping away from the very bottom of the screw. This will allow the screw to relax away from the tool in the toolholder. After removing the tool go back into the hole a third time with the flat bottom drill and it should just screw out of the hole. Eric
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    Understood.

    First off -- is it possible that the hex socket is metric instead of imperial (or imperial if you are using a metric hex key set)?
    But -- if you are willing to spend some money to be prepared for future problems like this -- there is a set of tools for drilling out taps -- and which will work on hardened setscrews too.
    Look for "omegadrill" (Omegadrill set # OD-SET 1). They have a URL on the box <www.omegadrill.com>. I got mine from MSC a while back. They are sometimes offered in their sales flyers -- but be sitting down when you look at the price. MSC's regular web price at the moment is $162.51. I could not find it in the flyer within easy reach. MSC's part number is: 77215606. You can check the other three sources below for the set -- or perhaps even be able to buy individual drills (the most expensive part of the 4-drill set).
    You did not mention the size of the setscrew. Is this like the Aloris sets -- just one of the clones? If so, a 200 size is like the BXA size. For those, the OD-3/16 might fit down into the socket to start the drilling on center, and the OD-1/4 could likely drill out the setscrew to near the bottom of the threads. These are the two largest bits in the set. And it is likely that the screws are a metric setscrew close to a 5/16" Imperial one. (About 8mm).
    The bits look quite weird, but work well in a rigid machine.
    O.K. Their "where to buy" link points to two I know and two I don't
=====================================================================MSC Industrial Supply, 1-800-645-7270 www.mscdirect.com
McMaster-Carr Supply, 1-630-833-0300 www.mcmaster.com
Airgas Rutland Tool, 1-800-289-4787 www.rutlandtool.com
Travers Tool Company, 1-800-221-0270 www.travers.com ====================================================================    Anyway -- loosen or remove all the other setscrews, clamp the holder in a vise, and drill through the setscrew until the tool becomes a little loose in the holder. Then pull it out, and move up to the next size of bit from the omegadrill set and keep going. Hopefully, when it bites in, it will spin the screw down into the channel the tool shank normally fits in.
    Another possibility -- check if there is clearance between the top of the tool shank and the top of the shank channel in the holder. If so -- try an abrasive disc -- something like the ones in Dremel sets, but likely you'll need a larger diameter. I have one about 3" diameter driven by a compressed air tool -- assuming you have an air compressor. I got this at a local auto parts place for not too much money. Given this, you may be able to cut through the bottom end of the setscrew, remove the tool, and then remove the top half of the setscrew.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
--
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"Bob La Londe" wrote in message
There is a cracked set screw in one of m Kwik 200 tool holders. It?s a 1/2 inch holder so its one of the most common and cheapest to find used. That being said there aren't as many used Kwik 200 tool holders to be found on the most obvious source (Ebay) as their used to be. I hate to pitch a tool holder I already have over such a cheap part.
Here is the problem. There is a tool in the holder and its well secured. I want to take the tool out, but even a clean crisp brand new hex key just pops around like the screw is rounded, but its not. I'd like to save the tool in the holder other wise I might be tempted to press it out.
*************
Well I drilled it out and smacked an extractor into it and still nothing. Unfortunately it drilled slightly off center and I don't think I want to chase down to the threads with bigger drills now. I think my next step will be to see if I can rotary cut a notch or two with a tiny burr and use a small drift to back drive it out.
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On Wed, 22 May 2019 09:24:08 -0700
<snip>

Slightly larger left-hand drill bit? Not cheap, especially for a set but McMaster carries most sizes in singles too. A good chance it would just unscrew when you hit the magic size that relieves the tension on it...
Do you have enough material to just drill a bigger hole, thread and use a larger set screw?
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On 5/22/2019 9:49 AM, Leon Fisk wrote:

I don't know how hard the tool holder is, but that's not a bad option.
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On 22/05/2019 22:11, Bob La Londe wrote:

I recently used some diamond hole saws to remove the remains of a broken HSS tap in a harder steel. Cheap Chinese hole saws but each went in about 1/4" before losing it cutting ability. I went through 3 and then just pulled out the remnants of the tap, haven't tried to finish the tapping yet, may temper the part slightly before trying to finish the tapping. The part is an ER16 collet holder which I was tapping 3/8" UNF to suit a Broom Wade die grinder as I have ER16 collets and thought it an improvement on my previous homemade collet and collet holder..
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