How to take the metal pin out

I have a metal pin look like this
| \ =====\ | /
It is attached to glass panel
| glass |====\ glass
| glass
I need to take the pin out. The flat part of the pin has dimension of 5/16 inch. The pin attached to a glass panel. I bought a 1/8" titanium bit and drilled the pin hopefully to break it apart. The drill bit just made a scratch on the pin but does not penetrate.
How should I take it out without breaking the glass panel ?
Thanks, Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Acid?
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On Nov 3, 1:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd try nitric acid
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wrote:

Acid would be good, but nitric isn't all that good of a choice. Hydrochloric will dissolve steel readily, and is inexpensive and readily available, unlike nitric. Sulfuric would do the job, too. Be sure to keep it submerged adequately, not only for cooling, but for keeping a fresh supply of acid at the work. Give the acid plenty of time to get the job done. HCl will actually work quite fast, thus the concern about heating.
Wear eye, skin and lung protection when working with these acids------and remember that the gas coming off will be hydrogen-----so do this where there is adequate ventilation, and there's nothing that will be ruined by rusting. If you do this operation inside, where there are iron surfaces, you can expect all of them to be damaged by the fumes.
Harold
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wrote:

Are you sure that hydrochloric acid doesn't etch glass? I thought it did, but my memory could be playing tricks.
-- Ed Huntress
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You're thinking of hydroflouric acid (HF) not hydrochloric (HCL). They're in the same family but HF is much more potent. Engineman
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wrote:

Yeah, I know that hydrofluoric is used for decorative etching, but I thought that hydrochloric also etches glass, or at least frosts it. I'll have to look it up and see if my memory is failing me.
-- Ed Huntress
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HCL is sometimes sold in glass bottles. Engineman
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Let's guess what they used for HF before plasics have been invented...? Glass would be proper guess. Covered with parafine/wax.
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wrote:

Yeah. Now covered with plastic. But it had to be the right type of glass.
-- Ed Huntress
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I think it was ceramic. Not soft glass but a high temp flowing rock much like used on welding rods.
Soapstone was used for some complex stuff.
Clay containers have held chemicals and food for thousands of years.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Ed Huntress wrote:

-
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I have a box of 4 gallons of it and a 8 pound bag of baking soda on the boardwalk to my shop. I bought the high quality HCL from a pool supply. The baking soda from Sams. The pool company quit buying the cheap common grade once used. I think they got some with enough of something that it stained something or messed up some other process. I use it to pickle steel (take off rust and etch) sometimes to preserve or recondition, but mostly to get tooth and a clean background for paint.
Hydrofluoric acid is most dangerous. It etches glass and dissolves semiconductor. It also flows through the skin and dissolves human and all cartilage in the joints. It doesn't feel good when you loose all the cartilage in a hand. Rather gritty. That is why I turned down a gallon jug from the FA lab in a semiconductor house I was an engineering manager in. We closed down that lab and had an independent HAS MAT team come in and clean up the lab. To many years it had gotten out of control.
The Has mat team were long time friends and skilled members of shut down fabs. Engineers and Chemists cleaning up others mess, not theirs. They got the training and developed processes only to loose their jobs in price crunches and aging equipment - lack of real profit to rebuild a $1B USD fab line.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

-
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wrote:

It appears that hydrochloric reacts noticeably with some glasses but not others. It will leach out metallic ions from several types of glass, leaving a lightly etched, often irridescent surface on the glass.
-- Ed Huntress
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Everyone,
Thanks for suggesting the Acid. Unfortunately, there is no easy way for me to apply it. The metal pin is attached to the metal frame which cover the top of glass. If I use Acid, I might destroy the metal frame. This link shows the picture of Kohler shower door.
http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/detail.jsp?from=thumb&frm=null&module=Glass+Showers+%26+Doors&item 995302&prod_nump2010-L&section=2&category
I'm trying to remove the top metal frame from it. Here is my crude diagram
----------------------------------- |Metal Frame | | |+ | O (pin) |+ | | ---------------------------------- | | | glass | | |
The metal frame protect the top part of the glass and provide the hinge to the door. I need to remove the pin so that I can take the metal frame out temporary. If I use acide on the pin, there is good chance it's going to destroy the metal frame as well.
If you think there are other way beside using the acid, please let me know.
Thanks Nick
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I would seriously consider using a diamond or silicon carbide abrasive bit and just grinding the pin down - if you make a little wax dam all around it you can keep water in there to cool and remove the ground up metal - it should grind away just fine if you are patient - a dremel tool (or better an air tool to eliminate shock hazard) would do the trick

http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/detail.jsp?from=thumb&frm=null&module=Glass+Showers+%26+Doors&item 995302&prod_nump2010-L&section=2&category
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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shower doors are tempered. i'd be very careful doing any grinding work on or near them, or you'll wind up with a buckfull of glass crumbs.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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wrote:

My experience with shower doors came about when the screw holding the side frame extrusion to that forming the bottom frame member broke off and the head and shank fell out. On dismounting the panel and turning it up till I could see the method of joining, I determined that the threaded portion of the screw could be seen through the slot in the extrusion, the tube that the screw was driven into was actually a "C" shape. I used a cut off wheel in my moto tool to grind a slot full depth, the full length of the remainder of the screw, whereupon the two pieces were readily removed with tweezers. The screw was then replaced with a SS #8 wood screw. Clear as mud? Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Hey Nick,
http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/pdf/1011451_2.pdf
Please refer to page 3 of that pdf.
Pry off the top back cover from the inside of the shower. Be sure to support the door so it doesn't shatter on the way down. Have someone on the other side gently remove the top hinge as you loosen the screws and back plate. That will separate the top hinge from the glass door. Pivot the door open and lift it off the bottom hinge half.
Be careful!
--Winston
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Winston wrote:

That's pretty funny..
John
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JohnM wrote:

Thankyouverymuch, I'm here till Tuesday. :)
--Winston
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